Posts

Gilmore Elected Chair of TN Black Caucus of State Legislators

Press release from the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus; February 12, 2015:

State Representative Brenda Gilmore has been elected Chairman of the Tennessee Black Caucus of State Legislators. Representative Gilmore is serving her fifth term in the Tennessee House representing District 54 in Davidson County. Prior to that, she spent 8 years on the Nashville Metro Council. Gilmore says, “It is a great honor to be elected Chair of this historic body that has worked tirelessly for Tennesseans. “ Democratic Caucus Chairman Mike Stewart noted Gilmore’s own tireless leadership in all her endeavors. Chairman Stewart said, “Representative Gilmore has brought a great deal of drive and energy to the State House and I believe that she will bring that same focus to the leadership of the Tennessee Black Caucus”.

Representative Gilmore serves on the House Business and Utilities Committee, the House Finance Ways and Means Committee, the House Business and Utilities Subcommittee and the Joint Fiscal Review Committee. She was also previously Vice-Chair of the Tennessee Black Caucus. Nationally, she serves as State Director for Women in Government, Executive Committee of the National Black Caucus of State Legislators (NBCSL) and Chair-elect of the Women’s Network, National Caucus of State Legislators (NCSL) and Executive Board of National Caucus of Environmental Legislators. Additionally, she has worked with the NAACP, the League of Women Voters, the Nashville Women Political Caucus and is a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority.

On the personal side, Gilmore is a proud graduate of Tennessee State University and received a Master of Human Resource Development degree from Vanderbilt University. She is married with one child and is a member of Mt. Zion Baptist Church.

TN Black Caucus Releases Statement on Zimmerman Verdict

Statement from the Tennessee Black Caucus of State Legislators; July 17, 2013:

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (July 17, 2013) – The Tennessee Black Caucus released the following statement in response to the not guilty verdict for George Zimmerman in the shooting death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida:

“This was a disappointing verdict that just goes to show we have a long way to go until all Americans enjoy true equal protection under the law,” said Rep. Larry Miller, Chairman of the Tennessee Black Caucus. “While we mourn and pray with the Martin family, we must also work hard to stop this from happening to innocent children here in Tennessee.”

On Sunday July 14, the National Black Caucus of State Legislators released a statement of support for the Martin family and reiterated the NBCSL opposition to so-called “stand your ground” laws across the country. In December of 2012, NBCSL ratified resolution LJE-13-06 “urging state legislatures that have adopted ‘Stand Your Ground’ or ‘Shoot First’ laws to reform or repeal them and we also support the review and investigation by the United States Department of Justice referencing the Zimmerman case.”

“Over the next few months, we will work with our fellow Representatives to review Tennessee’s ‘Stand Your Ground’ law to determine whether portions of the law need to be repealed or replaced in order to ensure the safety of all Tennessee residents,” said Rep. Miller. “We should look at laws, rules, regulations concerning neighborhood watch programs within our communities; how those programs are structured and operate for safety of the citizens and the community as a whole. No child should ever have to be afraid to walk peacefully down the sidewalk without being attacked because of the way they dress or the color of their skin. The unfortunate death of Trayvon Martin will not go in vain; we must turn a wrong into a right.

The Black Caucus will review Tennessee’s law to ensure the following rights are preserved:

  • The right to change an unjust system toward black men in this country to a just system for all men.
  • A right that criminal laws both federal and state should be equal for all men and women.
  • The right to freely move and travel without being racially profiled.
  • The right to be free in a free society.