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Cohen Announces $7M in Federal Grants to Address Homelessness in Memphis

Press release from U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn. 09; January 26, 2015:

[WASHINGTON, DC] – Congressman Steve Cohen (TN-09) today announced 34 federal grants totaling $6,909,905 to help local community organizations reduce homelessness in the Ninth District. This funding comes through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Continuum of Care program, which is designed to promote communitywide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness.

“This significant infusion of federal funding will help our communities and our local organizations work together to reduce homelessness in Memphis and improve the lives of individuals and families who are at risk of falling through the cracks,” said Congressman Cohen.

The 34 grants announced today include grants to the Memphis Strong Families Initiative, the organization One Door at a Time, the Beers-Van Gogh Center of Excellence, the Breaking the Cycle Shelter Plus Care nonprofit, and the Memphis Family Shelter. HUD’s Continuum of Care program provides funding to help non-profits, State, and local governments quickly rehouse homeless individuals and their families while minimizing trauma and dislocation. The program also aims to promote self-sufficiency among individuals and families experiencing homelessness.

Haslam Awards Greene Co $1.3M in TDOT, TDEC Grants

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 25, 2014:

GREENEVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced more than $1.3 million in grants to make downtown Greeneville and Walters State more pedestrian friendly, to improve energy efficiency in Greeneville’s Municipal Solid Waste Division with the purchase of a hybrid-automated garbage truck, and to convert the EastView pool into a splash pad.

“These types of projects strengthen our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars. Making our cities and towns more pedestrian friendly and improving our recreation areas improves the lives of Tennesseans. We want Tennessee to continue to be the very best place to live, work and raise a family, and projects like these are key to making that a reality.”

A $1 million transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund phase I of the Walters State Community College Pedestrian Facilities Project located in downtown Greeneville near the intersection of N. Main Street and Tusculum Boulevard. Walkways will connect the Monumental entrance, Main Street entrance, the campus amphitheater, the Greeneville Historical Walkway, and sidewalks outside the campus.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement and is administered by TDOT. A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A $197,000 Clean Energy Grant from Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) will be used to purchase an Autocar E3 Hybrid-automated garbage truck for Greeneville’s Municipal Solid Waste Division, replacing the conventional transmission to utilize hydraulic pressure to propel the truck and potentially saving Greeneville 2,908 gallons of fuel or $8,957 annually.

A $125,000 Local Park and Recreation Fund grant from TDEC to the town of Greeneville will go toward replacing the EastView pool with a new, state-of-the-art splash pad with numerous water features.

“From land acquisitions for new municipal parks to renovating and improving existing facilities, these grants help expand recreational opportunities for Tennessee citizens,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We are always looking for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency, and these investments in our local communities help improve the quality of life for all Tennesseans.”

Clean Tennessee Energy Grants were established by the Haslam administration in 2012 to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and other private and public organizations across Tennessee. These grants support projects designed to reduce air emissions, improve energy efficiency and create cost savings.

The Local Park and Recreation Fund is a 23-year-old state program that provides local governments with resources to support development and improvements to local parks, greenways, trails and recreational facilities. Grant recipients were selected through competitive scoring with careful consideration given to the projects that met the selection criteria and expressed the greatest local recreation need. All LPRF grants require a 50 percent match by the recipient.

Sen. Steve Southerland (R-Morristown), Rep. Jeremy Faison (R-Cosby), and Rep. David Hawk (R-Greeneville) represent Greene County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

Haslam Awards Shelby Co $1.4M in TDOT, TDEC Grants

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 23, 2014:

MEMPHIS – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced five grants totaling more than $1.4 million for Shelby County to make Walker Avenue in the University District more pedestrian friendly, enhance parks and recreation opportunities in Arlington, Collierville and Germantown, and to make the Shelby County Corrections facility more energy efficient.

“These types of projects strengthen our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars, and making our cities more pedestrian-friendly and enhancing our parks and recreation areas improves the lives of Tennesseans. We want Tennessee to continue to be the very best place to live, work and raise a family, and projects like these are key to making that a reality.”

A $458,830 transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund new curbs and gutters at crosswalks, new sidewalks, decorative park benches, bike racks, and pedestrian lighting along Walker Avenue in the University District adjacent to the University of Memphis.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement and is administered by TDOT. A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects, are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

Shelby County is also receiving three Local Park and Recreation Fund (LPRF) grants and a Clean Tennessee Energy Grant from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC).

“From land acquisitions for new municipal parks to renovating and improving existing facilities, these grants help expand recreational opportunities for Tennessee citizens,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We are always looking for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency, and these investments in our local communities help improve the quality of life for all Tennesseans.”

A $250,000 LPRF grant will be used to construct athletic fields at the new Forrest Street Park in Arlington.

Another $250,000 LPRF grant will be used for the Wolf River Boulevard Greenbelt Trail in Collierville. Phase I of the project will include a .58 mile trail, two pedestrian bridges, an observation deck for wildlife viewing and educational opportunities, and a small trailhead with four parking spaces and entrance signage.

A $208,000 LPRF grant will be used for a hay barn pavilion at the Bobby Lanier Farm Park in Germantown. The pavilion will offer farm-based education and also serve as an event center.

The LPRF is a 23-year old state program that provides local governments with resources to support development and improvements to local parks, greenways, trails and recreational facilities. Grant recipients were selected through competitive scoring with careful consideration given to the projects that met the selection criteria and expressed the greatest local recreation need. All LPRF grants require a 50 percent match by the recipient.

A $250,000 Clean Tennessee Energy Grant will be used to make the Shelby County Corrections facility more energy efficient and sustainable. Shelby County will add multiple solar thermal systems on housing units to be used as the primary source for heating water instead of natural gas and an ozone laundry system to conserve on both natural gas and water. Inmates will be trained during the installation and maintenance of these products as a re-entry strategy. The estimated long-term savings over a 20-year period for the full project is more than $1.6 million.

Clean Tennessee Energy Grants were established by the Haslam administration in 2012 to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and other private and public organizations across Tennessee. These grants support projects designed to reduce air emissions, improve energy efficiency and create cost savings.

Haslam Announces $587K in Grants for Waynesboro, Wayne Co

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 17, 2014:

WAYNESBORO – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced two grants totaling more than $587,000 for downtown revitalization in Wayne County and energy efficiency improvements at the Green River Surface Water Treatment Plant in Waynesboro.

“These types of projects are critical to strengthening our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars and reduces air emissions and creating a more pedestrian-oriented environment improves our cities’ and towns’ livability and quality of life for Tennesseans.”

A $23,600 Clean Tennessee Energy Grant to the City of Waynesboro from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) will support energy efficiency improvements at the Green River Surface Water Treatment Plant. This project will upgrade the control of four existing pump motors to allow more uniform pumping into the distribution system due to the large swing in day-to-day demands on the system. These improvements to the plant’s pump motors will create annual savings on the city’s power bill, and decreased electricity demand will also improve air quality by reducing emissions of nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide at the power generation stations.

“We are pleased to help the City of Waynesboro become more energy efficient,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We continue to look for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency within state government and within Tennessee’s communities.”

A $563,992 transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund Phase I of the Downtown Revitalization Project in Wayne County. The project includes replacing existing curbing, sidewalks, and pedestrian lighting and is located along the perimeter of the Wayne County Courthouse on US 64. The entrances and exits to the square parking area will also be relocated, creating a much safer crossing for pedestrians, and new landscaping and trees will be planted throughout the project area.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement, and is administered by TDOT.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects, are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

State Sen. Joey Hensley (R-Hohenwald) and Rep. Vance Dennis (R-Savannah) represent Wayne County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

Haslam Announces $800K in Recreational Trail Grants for Dresden, Martin

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 25, 2013:

DRESDEN – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced three grants totaling nearly $800,000 for Dresden and Martin to lengthen and develop recreational trails connecting the communities with the downtowns.

“These greenways and trails not only enhance the pedestrian experience of our communities, but they also provide new recreational and healthy ways for Tennesseans to enjoy their neighborhoods,” Haslam said. “Downtowns are the heart of our cities and towns, and the projects announced today will make important connections between various destinations and the Dresden and Martin downtowns.”

Dresden is receiving a $199,968 Recreational Trails Program (RTP) grant from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) as well as a $399,706 grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) to dedicate property as park land and convert a former railroad line into a multimodal pedestrian and cycling trail that connects to the heart of downtown Dresden.

Phase I of the Dresden Green Rail Trail project is located southeast of the Farmer’s Market trailhead at Linden Street and will connect to the Festival Park trail head south of Evergreen Street. It includes a ten-foot wide paved trail, decorative gateway entrances, landscaping, and park benches, bicycle racks and signage.

Martin is receiving a $200,000 RTP grant to extend the current Brian Brown Greenway to downtown Martin by constructing a multi-use trail approximately 3,000 feet long and 10 feet wide.

“We are excited to have this additional funding opportunity, which will assist the cities of Martin and Dresden in the development of a variety of new trails,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said.

The Recreational Trails Program is a federally-funded program established to distribute funding for motorized, non-motorized and diverse recreation trail projects. Recreational Trails Program grants may be used for non-routine maintenance and restoration of existing trails, development and rehabilitation, trailside or trailhead facilities such as restrooms, kiosks and parking lots, construction of new trails and land acquisition for recreational trails or corridors.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally-funded program administered by TDOT.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $294 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A variety of activities such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

State Sen. John Stevens (R-Huntington) and state Rep. Andy Holt (R-Dresden) represent Weakley County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

Haslam Announces Waste Management Grants for Development Districts

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 16, 2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau announced today nearly $304,000 in grants to support solid waste management activities in communities across Tennessee.

The Tennessee General Assembly established development districts in 1966 to do general and comprehensive planning and conduct development and administration activities for local governments, and the state’s nine development districts will receive grants totaling $303,674 in fiscal year 2013-2014.

“I appreciate the role Tennessee’s development districts play in supporting local communities and municipalities as they work together to manage and reduce solid waste,” Haslam said. “We are pleased to support these critical efforts and help fund projects for all nine districts in the upcoming fiscal year.”

Tennessee’s development districts assist the state’s solid waste planning regions in compiling information about landfills, source reduction, composting and recycling for the state’s Annual Progress Report. The report is a planning and reporting tool required by the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991, which was the first comprehensive solid waste planning legislation in Tennessee history. The data is used to determine each region’s progress towards Tennessee’s goal to achieve 25 percent waste reduction in Class I landfill solid waste.

Local governments also receive technical assistance from development districts in designing, implementing, upgrading and maintaining solid waste programs, systems and facilities, including landfills, convenience centers and recycling centers.

“The ongoing support of Tennessee’s development district offices is vital to the state’s long-term waste reduction planning and these resources are available to help support the important functions that advance those solid waste management goals,” Martineau said.

Grant amounts are determined on an annual basis and awarded based on available funding and the scope of work undertaken by each district. The grants announced today include:

  • East Tennessee Development District                        $28,844
  • First Tennessee Development District                       $36,400
  • Greater Nashville Regional Council                             $37,042
  • Memphis Area Association of Government                $22,575
  • Northwest Tennessee Development District             $44,825
  • Southwest Tennessee Development District             $28,350
  • Upper Cumberland Development District                 $33,708
  • South Central Tennessee Development District       $41,330
  • Southeast Tennessee Development District              $30,600

Development District grants were authorized by the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991 and are supported from the Solid Waste Management Fund that is administered by the Department of Environment and Conservation. The Solid Waste Management Fund receives its revenues from a tipping fee surcharge on each ton of solid waste disposed in Class I landfills and from a pre-disposal fee on new tires sold in the state.

Haslam Awards $3.6 M in Waste Tire Recycling Grants

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 8 ,2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau today announced 44 grants to help Tennessee communities recycle tires and reduce the number going to landfills.

The waste tire recycling grants total more than $3.6 million in fiscal year 2014-15, and the grants are supported from the Solid Waste Management Fund, which receives revenue from a pre-disposal fee on the purchase of new tires.

Tennessee recycles an estimated 55,000 tons of tires per year, diverting waste tires from landfills and sending them to beneficial end-use facilities. Beneficial end-use methods include utilizing tire-derived aggregate in civil engineering projects, crumb rubber for asphalt paving and molded rubber products. The majority of Tennessee’s waste tires are used as tire-derived fuel.

“The keys to this program’s success are the efforts of our local county and community partners,” Haslam said. “Reducing the number of tires in landfills and redirecting the tires to a better use helps conserve Tennessee’s natural resources for future generations.”

The General Assembly authorized waste tire grants in the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991. The grants assist counties with the collection, processing and transportation of the tires to beneficial end-use facilities. Counties are reimbursed $1 per eligible tire and are required to provide at least one waste tire collection site. Counties may charge an additional fee if the grant is not adequate to cover costs.

The fund is administered by the Department of Environment and Conservation, and $1.25 from the $1.35 pre-disposal fee collected is used to supplement the counties’ costs for waste tire recycling and services.

Tire-derived fuel, or TDF, conserves fossil fuels and provides a waste-to-energy disposal method. The energy value of TDF exceeds the value of other solid fuels such as coal. According to a study by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, TDF used in a properly designed and maintained combustion device emits fewer pollutants than conventional fossil fuels. In Tennessee, Abitibi Bowater Corporation, Packaging Corporation of America, Cemex Cement, Buzzi Unicem USA, and Gerdau Ameristeel are among those utilizing processed waste tires for fuel or as a source of carbon in their manufacturing process.

“The Solid Waste Management Fund continues to provide support to Tennessee communities and it’s important that local county governments continue to focus on waste reduction as part of their overall waste management plan,” added Martineau.

Purchasing longer life tires, rotating and balancing tires every 6,000 miles, and checking air pressure monthly are excellent ways to reduce the number of scrap tires generated in Tennessee and will also save money. For more information on Tennessee’s Waste Tire Program, please visit www.tn.gov/environment/swm/tires. A complete list of the grant awards is available in the attached release.

Oregon Senate Increases Grants to Job-training Programs

Press release from the Oregon State Senate Majority Caucus; July 3, 2013:

SB 498A authorizes grants for students to participate in skills training programs that could lead to careers

SALEM—Today the Oregon Senate voted to authorize additional funding for grants to job skills training programs that help students chart a path to good-paying jobs. Senate Bill 498A approves $7.5 million to the Career and Technical Education (CTE) Revitalization Grant Program, and it passed the Senate on a vote of 30-0.

“These workforce development and skills training programs give students a hands-on learning experience. They open the door to a world of job opportunities by introducing students to pathways that can lead to lifelong careers,” said Senate Majority Leader Diane Rosenbaum (D-Portland). “We need more career and technical education programs to strengthen Oregon’s workforce and meet the needs of the 21st Century economy.”

The CTE Revitalization Grant Program leverages innovative partnerships with local businesses and labor organizations to provide classes for high school students to gain workforce training opportunities. During the last budget cycle, 21 schools received CTE grants to offer new or improved vocational programs that partner with employers in the community.

“Having these key programs in our schools is essential to preparing students for success in life and developing a career,” said Rosenbaum. “Schools like Sabin-Schellenberg High School in my district offer lots of programs for students to learn technical skills. It’s an example of the type of opportunities every community should have.”

The goal of CTE programs is to meet the very real and immediate challenges of economic development, student achievement, and global competitiveness. Students who concentrate coursework in CTE programs are more likely to go on to higher education and get a four-year degree.

Taken together with an appropriation to the Oregon Department of Education, Oregon will have $9.4 million available for CTE grants in the coming biennium.

“Career and Technical Education is essential to growing Oregon’s economy, supporting the middle class, and getting people back to work,” said Senator Rod Monroe (D-Portland)

Senate Bill 498A now goes to the Oregon House of Representatives for a vote.

TN Pledges $4M in Race to the Top Funds for Leadership Development

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Education; May 6, 2013:

NASHVILLE — The Tennessee Department of Education has pledged nearly $4 million in Race to the Top funds to pay for eight leadership development programs, which will impact future school leaders in more than 20 districts across the state.

The TN LEAD grants were awarded to organizations in partnership with one or more school systems, to either develop or replicate programs aimed at increasing leader effectiveness and improving student outcomes. The programs will target current and pre-service educators, in order to deepen the pipeline of effective leaders in Tennessee schools.

A key requirement of the grant was to show evidence that the proposed programs were sustainable, said Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman.

“Training educators to be future leaders is one of the most important things we can do to ensure the sustainability of our work,” Huffman said. “Having effective principals and district leaders in place will make sure our efforts to improve education continue to pay off many years down the road.”

There were 20 applicants for the competitive TN LEAD grants. Eight recipients received funds, for a total of about $4 million. The programs target teachers who want to be principals, those who seek a teacher-leader role in their school, as well as district personnel who hope to serve in a school leadership position. The winners represent a wide range of innovative approaches, including university-based programs, a rural collaborative, and a multi-district partnership with top principals in China. The leadership development programs will begin this month and continue through July 2014.

Paul Fleming, the department’s executive director of leadership development, and former principal of Metro Nashville’s Hume-Fogg Academic Magnet High School, said that next to teachers, a highly effective leader is the number one factor that impacts student achievement at a school.

“Principals are the gatekeepers; they either encourage high-quality innovation, or they keep it out. They set the tone for the entire building,” he said. “With some of Tennessee’s important initiatives like the Common Core State Standards, there has never been a more important time to have effective leaders in place.”

Please see the attached document for more information about the eight TN LEAD grant recipients.

Two Anderson Co. Companies Awarded Job Training Grants

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development; March 5, 2013:

NASHVILLE – Governor Bill Haslam and Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development Commissioner Karla Davis have awarded $29,947 to Protomet Corporation in Oak Ridge and $25,000 to Techmer PM in Clinton.

“If Tennessee is going to become the number one location in the Southeast for high-quality jobs, then we must offer a well-trained workforce to employers,” said Governor Haslam. “This kind of training grant not only helps educate workers, but also provides incentive to employers looking to relocate or expand in Tennessee.”

“Both job creation and retention are vital in maintaining a healthy economy in Tennessee, and the Incumbent Worker Training program has played a key role in accomplishing this,” said Commissioner Davis. “Since the program’s inception, Incumbent Worker Training grants have assisted more than 600 businesses by providing $14 million to train approximately 50,000 employees.”

In their application for the grant, Protomet Corporation stated this grant would allow the company to balance capital expenditures with process and organizational improvements to keep cost low and compete in theglobal economy allowing the business to grow and retain employees.

In their application for the grant, Techmer PM stated this grant would develop the skills that will allow the team to identify waste throughout the process. The removal of the waste – time, money, and resources – will keep Techmer PM competitive in the market and assist in growing the business.

“I would like to thank Governor Haslam and Commissioner Davis for their involvement in awarding this grant to the workers of Anderson County,” said Senator Randy McNally.

“By investing in the skills of Tennessee’s workforce, we’re also investing in our future economic success,” said Representative John Ragan.

The East Tennessee Human Resource Agency played a key role in awarding the grant to Protomet Corporation.

The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development administers the Incumbent Worker Training program. The program has been structured to be flexible to meet the business’s training objectives. The business may use public, private, or its own in-house training provider based on the nature of the training.

The following criteria must be met to qualify for the Incumbent Worker Training Program. Employersmust be in operation in Tennessee for at least one year prior to application date. Employers must have at least five full-time employees, demonstrate financial viability and be current on all state tax obligations. Funding priority is given to businesses whose grant proposals represent a significant layoff avoidance strategy and represent a significant upgrade of skills.