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TDEC Pushes Energy Efficiency Projects for Local Gov’ts, Housing Authorities

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; August 28, 2014:

Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau announced the launch of a new program to provide education, outreach and technical assistance to local jurisdictions and public housing authorities to support implementation of energy efficiency and energy management projects.

With a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, TDEC’s Office of Energy Programs and its subrecipient grantee, expert energy efficiency consultancy group Clean Energy Solutions, Inc., will educate local officials on the benefits of energy efficiency and provide technical assistance on cost-effective energy efficiency measures, such as: building audits and reviews; requests for proposals or requests for qualifications to scope energy efficiency improvement projects; collaborating with energy service companies; benchmarking energy and water usage; measurement and verification of energy savings; and procurement and contracting assistance.

The program will explore major financing options to support energy efficiency improvements, such as energy performance contracting, utility incentives, and utility bill repayments. Other financing options may be identified during the grant period, which currently runs through early 2016.

“TDEC is pleased to have the opportunity to collaborate with local government and public housing authority partners in an effort to promote energy efficiency in the State’s harder to reach sectors,” said Commissioner Martineau. “We thank the U.S. Department of Energy for providing the funding for TDEC and its partners to provide often-needed technical consultation and support at the local level.”

Tennessee was one of sixteen states to receive a competitive U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program 2013 award overall and just one of six states to receive an award in the “Public Buildings Retrofit” category. Additional information on the State Energy Program 2013 is available at http://energy.gov/eere/wipo/sep-2013-competitive-solicitation.

The program is available at no cost to local jurisdictions, including city and county governments, and public housing authorities in the State of Tennessee through January 2016. Interested agencies are encouraged to contact Luke Gebhard, Senior Program Manager of TDEC’s Office of Energy Programs, at 615-741-2994 or luke.gebhard@tn.gov.

Haslam Awards Greene Co $1.3M in TDOT, TDEC Grants

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 25, 2014:

GREENEVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced more than $1.3 million in grants to make downtown Greeneville and Walters State more pedestrian friendly, to improve energy efficiency in Greeneville’s Municipal Solid Waste Division with the purchase of a hybrid-automated garbage truck, and to convert the EastView pool into a splash pad.

“These types of projects strengthen our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars. Making our cities and towns more pedestrian friendly and improving our recreation areas improves the lives of Tennesseans. We want Tennessee to continue to be the very best place to live, work and raise a family, and projects like these are key to making that a reality.”

A $1 million transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund phase I of the Walters State Community College Pedestrian Facilities Project located in downtown Greeneville near the intersection of N. Main Street and Tusculum Boulevard. Walkways will connect the Monumental entrance, Main Street entrance, the campus amphitheater, the Greeneville Historical Walkway, and sidewalks outside the campus.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement and is administered by TDOT. A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A $197,000 Clean Energy Grant from Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) will be used to purchase an Autocar E3 Hybrid-automated garbage truck for Greeneville’s Municipal Solid Waste Division, replacing the conventional transmission to utilize hydraulic pressure to propel the truck and potentially saving Greeneville 2,908 gallons of fuel or $8,957 annually.

A $125,000 Local Park and Recreation Fund grant from TDEC to the town of Greeneville will go toward replacing the EastView pool with a new, state-of-the-art splash pad with numerous water features.

“From land acquisitions for new municipal parks to renovating and improving existing facilities, these grants help expand recreational opportunities for Tennessee citizens,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We are always looking for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency, and these investments in our local communities help improve the quality of life for all Tennesseans.”

Clean Tennessee Energy Grants were established by the Haslam administration in 2012 to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and other private and public organizations across Tennessee. These grants support projects designed to reduce air emissions, improve energy efficiency and create cost savings.

The Local Park and Recreation Fund is a 23-year-old state program that provides local governments with resources to support development and improvements to local parks, greenways, trails and recreational facilities. Grant recipients were selected through competitive scoring with careful consideration given to the projects that met the selection criteria and expressed the greatest local recreation need. All LPRF grants require a 50 percent match by the recipient.

Sen. Steve Southerland (R-Morristown), Rep. Jeremy Faison (R-Cosby), and Rep. David Hawk (R-Greeneville) represent Greene County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

Haslam Announces Nearly $600K in TDOT, TDEC Grants for Hardin Co

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 23, 2014:

SAVANNAH – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced three grants totaling $585,517 to fund phase II of the Pedestrian Sidewalk Project in Savannah, improve the Hank DeBerry Complex, and make Savannah’s City Hall more energy efficient.

“These types of projects strengthen our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars. Making our cities and towns more pedestrian friendly and improving our recreation areas improves the lives of Tennesseans. We want Tennessee to continue to be the very best place to live, work and raise a family, and projects like these are key to making that a reality.”

A $243,913 transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund phase II of the Pedestrian Sidewalk Project in Savannah, including construction of sidewalks on the east side of Tennessee Street from the southwest corner of the new Tennessee Street Park to Main Street. Sidewalks will also be installed along the north side of Main Street from the downtown district to Hogohegee Drive, which will connect the historic Cherry Street Mansion and the Tennessee River Overlook.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement and is administered by TDOT. A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A $250,000 Local Park and Recreation Fund grant from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for Hardin County and the city of Savannah will be used at the Hank DeBerry Complex to remove existing poles and fixtures at the ball fields and make upgrades to underground wiring and electrical panels to accommodate new energy efficient lights.

A $91,604 Clean Energy Grant from TDEC will be used to make Savannah’s City Hall more energy efficient by installing energy efficient ceiling lights, replacing 10 HVAC units with an energy efficiency of SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) 13, reconstructing a 4,600 square foot section of flat roof with energy saving materials to reduce energy consumption for heating and cooling purposes, and constructing vestibules at the main three entrances to City Hall. The total estimated annual energy usage reduction is estimated to be 27,601 kWh, which is equivalent to 19.5 metric tons of greenhouse gas reductions. The estimated yearly savings for the upgrades will be approximately $3,126.

“From land acquisitions for new municipal parks to renovating and improving existing facilities, these grants help expand recreational opportunities for Tennessee citizens,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We are always looking for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency, and these investments in our local communities help improve the quality of life for all Tennesseans.”

The Local Park and Recreation Fund is a 23-year-old state program that provides local governments with resources to support development and improvements to local parks, greenways, trails and recreational facilities. Grant recipients were selected through competitive scoring with careful consideration given to the projects that met the selection criteria and expressed the greatest local recreation need. All LPRF grants require a 50 percent match by the recipient.

Clean Tennessee Energy Grants were established by the Haslam administration in 2012 to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and other private and public organizations across Tennessee. These grants support projects designed to reduce air emissions, improve energy efficiency and create cost savings.

Sen. Dolores Gresham (R-Somerville) and Rep. Vance Dennis (R-Savannah) represent Hardin County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

Haslam Awards Shelby Co $1.4M in TDOT, TDEC Grants

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 23, 2014:

MEMPHIS – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced five grants totaling more than $1.4 million for Shelby County to make Walker Avenue in the University District more pedestrian friendly, enhance parks and recreation opportunities in Arlington, Collierville and Germantown, and to make the Shelby County Corrections facility more energy efficient.

“These types of projects strengthen our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars, and making our cities more pedestrian-friendly and enhancing our parks and recreation areas improves the lives of Tennesseans. We want Tennessee to continue to be the very best place to live, work and raise a family, and projects like these are key to making that a reality.”

A $458,830 transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund new curbs and gutters at crosswalks, new sidewalks, decorative park benches, bike racks, and pedestrian lighting along Walker Avenue in the University District adjacent to the University of Memphis.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement and is administered by TDOT. A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects, are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

Shelby County is also receiving three Local Park and Recreation Fund (LPRF) grants and a Clean Tennessee Energy Grant from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC).

“From land acquisitions for new municipal parks to renovating and improving existing facilities, these grants help expand recreational opportunities for Tennessee citizens,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We are always looking for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency, and these investments in our local communities help improve the quality of life for all Tennesseans.”

A $250,000 LPRF grant will be used to construct athletic fields at the new Forrest Street Park in Arlington.

Another $250,000 LPRF grant will be used for the Wolf River Boulevard Greenbelt Trail in Collierville. Phase I of the project will include a .58 mile trail, two pedestrian bridges, an observation deck for wildlife viewing and educational opportunities, and a small trailhead with four parking spaces and entrance signage.

A $208,000 LPRF grant will be used for a hay barn pavilion at the Bobby Lanier Farm Park in Germantown. The pavilion will offer farm-based education and also serve as an event center.

The LPRF is a 23-year old state program that provides local governments with resources to support development and improvements to local parks, greenways, trails and recreational facilities. Grant recipients were selected through competitive scoring with careful consideration given to the projects that met the selection criteria and expressed the greatest local recreation need. All LPRF grants require a 50 percent match by the recipient.

A $250,000 Clean Tennessee Energy Grant will be used to make the Shelby County Corrections facility more energy efficient and sustainable. Shelby County will add multiple solar thermal systems on housing units to be used as the primary source for heating water instead of natural gas and an ozone laundry system to conserve on both natural gas and water. Inmates will be trained during the installation and maintenance of these products as a re-entry strategy. The estimated long-term savings over a 20-year period for the full project is more than $1.6 million.

Clean Tennessee Energy Grants were established by the Haslam administration in 2012 to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and other private and public organizations across Tennessee. These grants support projects designed to reduce air emissions, improve energy efficiency and create cost savings.

Haslam Announces More Than $730K in Grants for Overton Co

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 22, 2014:

LIVINGSTON – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced three grants totaling more than $730,000 to enhance the public square and create a new two-acre park in Livingston and to improve the Hanging Limb Recreation Center in Overton County.

“We want Tennessee to continue to be the very best place to live, work and raise a family, and projects like these are key to making that a reality,” Haslam said. “Making downtown areas more inviting and accessible and enhancing our parks and recreation areas improve the lives of Tennesseans.”

A $450,953 transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund the Public Square Enhancements Project located near the historic Overton County Courthouse in downtown Livingston. The project includes the addition of decorative crosswalks at each of the square’s four corners and the replacement of sidewalks and handicap ramps. Once complete, the project will link the courthouse to other public buildings, local businesses and a future park and amphitheater.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement and is administered by TDOT. A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects, are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

Overton County is receiving two Local Park and Recreation Fund (LPRF) grants from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC).

A $250,000 LPRF grant will be used to create a new two-acre park in Livingston with a playground, splash pad, restroom facility, parking lot, vendor area, walking path, decorative lighting and fencing, picnic tables and benches.

A $32,000 LPRF grant will be used to improve the Hanging Limb Recreation Center, including building a basketball court, replacing a seesaw and merry-go-round, installing ADA-compliant surfacing throughout the playground area and constructing ADA-compliant parking and paths connecting various activities as well as ADA-compliant picnic tables and charcoal grills.

The LPRF is a 23-year old state program that provides local governments with resources to support development and improvements to local parks, greenways, trails and recreational facilities. Grant recipients were selected through competitive scoring with careful consideration given to the projects that met the selection criteria and expressed the greatest local recreation need. All LPRF grants require a 50 percent match by the recipient.

“From land acquisitions for new municipal parks to renovating and improving existing facilities, these grants help expand recreational opportunities for Tennessee citizens,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We are excited to work with each of these grantees and to see the future of these projects for this community.”

Sen. Charlotte Burks (D-Monterey) and Rep. John Mark Windle (D-Livingston) represent Overton County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

TDEC: ‘Farm to Table’ Pilot Program Launched at Paris Landing

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; June 25, 2014:

PARIS, Tenn. – State officials from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and the Department of Agriculture, along with local civic leaders, farmers and park supporters, kicked off a “Farm to Table” Pilot Program at Paris Landing State Park today.

The Tennessee State Park System, which is part of TDEC, continues to look for ways to increase the amount of locally grown food served at State Parks restaurants. Procuring locally-grown food products is both environmentally sustainable and economically supportive of communities that produce the products.

“Local foods benefit the environment and wildlife. Well managed farms provide ecosystems that conserve the soil, protect water sources, and sequester carbon from the atmosphere. The patchwork of fields and ponds provide habitat for wildlife,” said TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau. “These partnerships are a win for all, and we are beyond thrilled with how the event turned out today.”

Tennessee Department of Agriculture’s Division of Market Development partnered with Tennessee State Parks to locate, visit and evaluate farmers around Paris Landing State Park that can produce enough quantity to support the restaurant operations at a price that is economically feasible for customers.

“Our State Park system is truly a gem and an important draw for visitors. It just makes sense to enhance that experience by connecting them with local producers and processors,” Agriculture Commissioner Julius Johnson said. “I want to thank Commissioner Martineau and his team at TDEC for leading this effort and for supporting the local agricultural economy through our Pick Tennessee Products program.”

Tennessee State Park restaurants offer southern cooking served buffet style, menu service, catering and, conference banquets. There are six resort inns and all include a food service operation, serving three meals daily. All restaurants also offer catering on-site for picnics, meetings, conferences and other special events.

Tennessee’s 54 state parks offer diverse natural, recreational and cultural experiences for individuals, families, or business and professional groups. State park features range from pristine natural areas to 18-hole championship golf courses. There is a state park within an hour’s drive of just about anywhere in the state, offering a variety of recreational, lodging and dining choices. For more information about Tennessee State Parks, visit www.tnstateparks.com.

Pick Tennessee Products is program developed by the Tennessee Department of Agriculture to help consumers connect with locally grown and processed foods and other agriculture related enterprises. Local products and more can be found at www.picktnproducts.org or through the “Pick Tennessee” mobile app available from both the App Store and from Google Play.

TN Awards More Than $5.7 M in Loans for Water, Wastewater Infrastructure Improvements

Press release from the office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; November 1, 2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau announced today that two communities, one utility district and one water/wastewater authority have been approved to receive more than $5.7 million in low-interest loans for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.

“Making needed infrastructure improvements to address drinking water and wastewater needs will benefit the health of communities and economic growth, and I’m pleased to see local governments taking advantage of this resource,” Haslam said.

The State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan Program provides low-interest loans that help communities, utility districts, and water and wastewater authorities finance projects that protect Tennessee’s ground and surface waters and public health. Loans are used to finance the planning, design and construction of water and wastewater facilities.

Through the SRF Program, communities, utility districts, and water and wastewater authorities can obtain loans with lower interest rates than most can obtain through private financing. Interest rates for loans can vary from zero percent to market rate based on each community’s economic index. Loans utilizing the 2012 EPA grant funds include a principal forgiveness component for water and wastewater projects.

“The State Revolving Fund Loan Program is a key investment for local communities in maintaining environmental and public health, while preparing for future needs,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said.

The Department of Environment and Conservation administers the SRF Loan Program for the state of Tennessee in conjunction with the Tennessee Local Development Authority. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides grants to fund the program, and the state provides a 20 percent match. Loan repayments are returned to the program and are used to fund future SRF loans.

The funding order of projects is determined by the SRF Loan Program’s Priority Ranking Lists that rank potential projects according to the severity of their pollution and/or compliance problems or for the protection of public health.

The loans announced today are:

Wastewater Loan:

  • City of Cowan (Franklin County) – The City of Cowan will receive $500,000 for a project that includes wastewater treatment plant improvements. The project will be funded with a 20-year, $400,000 loan with an interest rate of 0.17 percent and $100,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.

Drinking Water Loan:

  • Cordell Hull Utility District (Smith County) – The Cordell Hull UD will receive $500,000 for a project that includes replacement of the existing 100,000 gallon storage tank with a new 250,000 gallon storage tank. The project will be funded with a 20-year, $400,000 loan with an interest rate of 0.92 percent and $100,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.

Traditional Wastewater Loan:

  • Jackson Energy Authority (Gibson County) – The Jackson Energy Authority will receive an increase of $3,953,352 to an existing $5 million, 20-year loan which brings the total to $8,953,352 with an interest rate of 0.34% for a project that includes sewer system rehabilitation.

Traditional Drinking Water Loan:

  • City of Ridgely (Lake County) – The city of Ridgely will receive an $810,000, 20-year loan with an interest rate of 0.01 percent for replacement of two existing wells with two new wells.

Since its inception in 1987, Tennessee’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund Loan Program has awarded more than $1.5 billion in low-interest loans. Since its inception in 1996, Tennessee’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Loan Program has awarded more than $217 million in low-interest loans. Both programs combined award more than $80 million annually to Tennessee’s local governments for water and wastewater infrastructure projects.

Any local government interested in the SRF Loan Program should contact the State Revolving Fund Loan Program, Tennessee Tower, 12th Floor, 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue, Nashville, TN 37243, or call (615) 532-0445. Additional information about the SRF Loan Program may be found online at http://www.tn.gov/environment/water/fund.shtml.

Haslam Announces Waste Management Grants for Development Districts

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 16, 2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau announced today nearly $304,000 in grants to support solid waste management activities in communities across Tennessee.

The Tennessee General Assembly established development districts in 1966 to do general and comprehensive planning and conduct development and administration activities for local governments, and the state’s nine development districts will receive grants totaling $303,674 in fiscal year 2013-2014.

“I appreciate the role Tennessee’s development districts play in supporting local communities and municipalities as they work together to manage and reduce solid waste,” Haslam said. “We are pleased to support these critical efforts and help fund projects for all nine districts in the upcoming fiscal year.”

Tennessee’s development districts assist the state’s solid waste planning regions in compiling information about landfills, source reduction, composting and recycling for the state’s Annual Progress Report. The report is a planning and reporting tool required by the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991, which was the first comprehensive solid waste planning legislation in Tennessee history. The data is used to determine each region’s progress towards Tennessee’s goal to achieve 25 percent waste reduction in Class I landfill solid waste.

Local governments also receive technical assistance from development districts in designing, implementing, upgrading and maintaining solid waste programs, systems and facilities, including landfills, convenience centers and recycling centers.

“The ongoing support of Tennessee’s development district offices is vital to the state’s long-term waste reduction planning and these resources are available to help support the important functions that advance those solid waste management goals,” Martineau said.

Grant amounts are determined on an annual basis and awarded based on available funding and the scope of work undertaken by each district. The grants announced today include:

  • East Tennessee Development District                        $28,844
  • First Tennessee Development District                       $36,400
  • Greater Nashville Regional Council                             $37,042
  • Memphis Area Association of Government                $22,575
  • Northwest Tennessee Development District             $44,825
  • Southwest Tennessee Development District             $28,350
  • Upper Cumberland Development District                 $33,708
  • South Central Tennessee Development District       $41,330
  • Southeast Tennessee Development District              $30,600

Development District grants were authorized by the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991 and are supported from the Solid Waste Management Fund that is administered by the Department of Environment and Conservation. The Solid Waste Management Fund receives its revenues from a tipping fee surcharge on each ton of solid waste disposed in Class I landfills and from a pre-disposal fee on new tires sold in the state.

Haslam Awards $3.6 M in Waste Tire Recycling Grants

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 8 ,2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau today announced 44 grants to help Tennessee communities recycle tires and reduce the number going to landfills.

The waste tire recycling grants total more than $3.6 million in fiscal year 2014-15, and the grants are supported from the Solid Waste Management Fund, which receives revenue from a pre-disposal fee on the purchase of new tires.

Tennessee recycles an estimated 55,000 tons of tires per year, diverting waste tires from landfills and sending them to beneficial end-use facilities. Beneficial end-use methods include utilizing tire-derived aggregate in civil engineering projects, crumb rubber for asphalt paving and molded rubber products. The majority of Tennessee’s waste tires are used as tire-derived fuel.

“The keys to this program’s success are the efforts of our local county and community partners,” Haslam said. “Reducing the number of tires in landfills and redirecting the tires to a better use helps conserve Tennessee’s natural resources for future generations.”

The General Assembly authorized waste tire grants in the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991. The grants assist counties with the collection, processing and transportation of the tires to beneficial end-use facilities. Counties are reimbursed $1 per eligible tire and are required to provide at least one waste tire collection site. Counties may charge an additional fee if the grant is not adequate to cover costs.

The fund is administered by the Department of Environment and Conservation, and $1.25 from the $1.35 pre-disposal fee collected is used to supplement the counties’ costs for waste tire recycling and services.

Tire-derived fuel, or TDF, conserves fossil fuels and provides a waste-to-energy disposal method. The energy value of TDF exceeds the value of other solid fuels such as coal. According to a study by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, TDF used in a properly designed and maintained combustion device emits fewer pollutants than conventional fossil fuels. In Tennessee, Abitibi Bowater Corporation, Packaging Corporation of America, Cemex Cement, Buzzi Unicem USA, and Gerdau Ameristeel are among those utilizing processed waste tires for fuel or as a source of carbon in their manufacturing process.

“The Solid Waste Management Fund continues to provide support to Tennessee communities and it’s important that local county governments continue to focus on waste reduction as part of their overall waste management plan,” added Martineau.

Purchasing longer life tires, rotating and balancing tires every 6,000 miles, and checking air pressure monthly are excellent ways to reduce the number of scrap tires generated in Tennessee and will also save money. For more information on Tennessee’s Waste Tire Program, please visit www.tn.gov/environment/swm/tires. A complete list of the grant awards is available in the attached release.

TDEC to Hold Workshops on Recreational Grant Application Process

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; January 29, 2013:

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has announced a series of helpful workshops in February, designed to explain the grant application process for the department’s Recreational Trails or Tennessee Recreation Initiative programs.

Recreational Trails Program

Kicking off the 2013 Recreational Trails Program grant cycle, TDEC’s Division of Recreation Educational Services will host three workshops on Tuesday, February 12, in each grand division of the state. These workshops are specifically geared toward eligible applicants, such as government officials, parks and recreation departments and non-profit organizations.

Recreational Trails Program grants may be used for non-routine maintenance and restoration of existing trails, development and rehabilitation, trailside or trailhead facilities such as restrooms, kiosks and parking lots, construction of new trails, and land acquisition for recreational trails or corridors. Federal, state and local government agencies may apply, as well as non-profit organizations that have obtained IRS 501(c)(3) status and have a written trail management agreement with the agency that owns the property where the trail project is located.

The February 12, 2013, workshops will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. (local times apply) at the following locations:

  • Environment and Conservation’s Jackson Environmental Field Office, 1625 Hollywood Drive, Jackson, Tenn., 38305
  • Environment and Conservation’s Downtown Nashville Central Office, 401 Church Street, L&C Tower, 17th Floor Conference Room, Nashville, Tenn., 37243
  • Environment and Conservation’s Knoxville Environmental Field Office, 3711 Middlebrook Pike, Knoxville, Tenn., 37921
  • Funding for RTP grants is provided by the Federal Highway Administration through the federal Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act. The Department of Environment and Conservation administers this grant program for the state of Tennessee.

The application deadline for the 2013 Recreational Trails Programs grant cycle is May 3, 2013, at 4 p.m. (Central), and may be submitted in CD format (no binders will be accepted). The RTP grant is an 80/20 percent match, with a minimum grant of $20,000 ($5,000 match required) and a maximum grant of $200,000 ($50,000 match required).

For more information about the upcoming RTP application workshop or to register, contact Carol Thompson at (615) 532-0208 or carol.h.thompson@tn.gov; or contact Recreation Educational Services at (615) 532-0748 or tdec.res@tn.gov.

Tennessee Recreation Initiative Program

TDEC also is soliciting Tennessee Recreation Initiative Program grant applications from local governments that do not currently have established parks or recreation departments (or a previously established department). TRIP grants help communities create recreation opportunities for citizens by assisting with the establishment of a parks department. A workshop will be held in Nashville on Wednesday, February 20, beginning at 10 a.m. (Central) at TDEC’s Downtown Nashville Central Office (401 Church Street, L&C Tower) in the 10th Floor Conference Room.

The Tennessee Recreation Initiative Program was created in 1995 by the General Assembly and administered through TDEC. The TRIP program provides grants to hire a professional director, establish a recreation office and to hire other staff as needed. Eligible incorporated cities or county governments may apply for funding through a competitive matching grant process.

During the 2013 grant cycle, a maximum of three grants will be awarded on the basis of need and population for any city or county in Tennessee. The grant is offered over a three-year period. During the first two years of the program, the community will be required to match up to $50,000. The community is responsible for 100 percent of the funding during the third year.

TRIP grant applications are due March 29, 2013, and may be submitted on a CD (no binders will be accepted). For more information about the upcoming TRIP application workshop or to register, contact Carol Thompson at (615) 532-0208 or carol.h.thompson@tn.gov; or contact Recreation Educational Services at (615) 532-0748 or tdec.res@tn.gov.

Information about both the RTP and TRIP grants, along with other recreation or conservation-based grant programs that may be available in the future, can be found on TDEC’s website at www.tn.gov/environment/recreation/.