Video Gallery: Arne Duncan Talks TN Education Reforms

When U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan swung through Nashville last week to chat about his recent push to give states an out from the No Child Left Behind Act, he spent plenty of time talking about moving the needle on student performance in Tennessee.

“I just love what I see here,” he told reporters. “What I see here is courageous leadership at the top, I see a governor who’s walking the walk.”

TNReport shot lots of video, including the entire panel discussion that included him, Gov. Bill Haslam, Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman, Tennessee Education Association President Gera Summerford, State Collaborative on Reforming Education CEO Jamie Woodson, and Chris Barbic, superintendent of the newly-created Achievement School District.

Part 1 of the panel discussion at West End Middle School includes opening comments from the governor and Duncan as well as introductions of all the session’s participants. The panelists each offer their take on the biggest challenges to sustaining momentum on education reform, thoughts about the new teacher evaluation process and the disconnect between governors promising reforms and actually delivering them.

Part 2 includes questions from the audience, like what the structure and operation of the state’s new “Achievement School District” will look like, the role of school counselors in promoting emotional and educational development, the Volunteer State’s chances of opting out of the No Child Left Behind education law, thoughts about the state banning teachers unions from traditional contract negotiations, what the state is doing to recruit high-quality teachers and whether loosening up charter school restrictions helped Tennessee win the federal Race to the Top contest.

Part 3 includes more audience questions, such as how to get parents more involved in their children’s education and whether it’s possible for officials at all levels of government to embrace the belief that all children are capable of learning. Haslam wrapped up the session.

In this video, Duncan tells reporters he will exempt states from No Child Left Behind standards if they can show they’re working to improve education and are being brutally honest about their results.

“Let’s not kid ourselves,” said Haslam, who added that compensation may not be the most important thing that motivates teachers, but it is important nonetheless.

Haslam and Duncan weighed in on the ongoing debate over the effectiveness of state-funded pre-K programs. Haslam says the public should expect incremental growth in the state’s program as it collects more in tax revenues. Duncan added that the key is a quality pre-K program, not “bonafide babysitters.”

Duncan talks with reporters specifically about what he thinks of Tennessee’s education reforms and the push-back it is getting from teachers.