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Casada Looks Forward to Quizzing Textbook Commission

Rep. Glen Casada says he has a lot of questions for the State Textbook Commission due to what he calls “biased” material in the social studies books currently being used by Tennessee schoolchildren.

The Joint Subcommittee of Government Operations is scheduled to meet Wednesday with and review the governor-appointed panel and decide whether it should continue to exist, or whether reforms of some sort are warranted. Casada, the House GOP caucus chairman, said the discussion should prove interesting.

“The chairman of the committee, Sen. Mike Bell, is going to allow parents from across the state to give testimony as to the bias they see in their textbooks in their home counties,” said Casada. Bell is a Republican from Riceville.

Casada, who serves with Bell on the committee, said he doesn’t at this point have any preconceived ideas about what should happen after the meeting. He said he’s “just curious as to what the Textbook Commission is going to say,” that he’s hoping for answers to “allegations” that some textbooks public schools are using in Tennessee are ideologically prejudiced against capitalism and Western Culture.

Casada said he has reviewed two social studies textbooks and both “put in bad light the free-market system.”

“There are dozens, and I mean literally dozens, of examples of bias,” he said. “For example, there’s a question that’s just stated as a fact that capitalism is one of the causes of poverty. Well, that’s insane. Capitalism is what gets us out of poverty. It’s socialism that puts us in poverty. Yet no where in this textbook is that example given.”

Additionally, Casada takes issue with the books’ depiction of “foreign despots,” such as Mao Tse Tung. Casada said the communist dictator “is uplifted as a man who brought education and health care to his people in China.”

“But nowhere in that page when they talk about the Cultural Revolution do they mention the millions of people he killed,” said Casada.

Tennessee law requires representatives from most state agencies to appear before the Legislature periodically to justify their work and why the agency or commission is still needed. Casada said he finds selection of the textbook commission unusual because, unlike with other boards and commissions, there’s no involvement of the Legislature.

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