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Haslam Announces More Than $20.6 M in Water, Wastewater Construction Loans

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; March 2, 2015:

Low-Interest Loans Help Fund Infrastructure Improvements 

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau today announced that seven communities and one utility district have been approved to receive more than $20.6 million in low-interest loans for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.

The State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan Program provides low-interest loans that help communities, utility districts, and water and wastewater authorities finance projects that protect Tennessee’s ground and surface waters and public health.  Loans are used to finance the planning, design and construction of water and wastewater facilities.

“The State Revolving Fund Loan Program helps communities address current infrastructure needs and prepare for future needs, improving the health of our communities and their ability to grow,” Haslam said.

Through the SRF Program, communities, utility districts, and water and wastewater authorities can obtain loans with lower interest rates than most can obtain through private financing.  Interest rates for loans can vary from zero percent to market rate based on each community’s economic index.  Loans utilizing EPA grant funds can include a principal forgiveness component.

“Community investments in our drinking water and wastewater systems are vital to maintaining environmental and public health,” Martineau said.  “These loans will help keep our communities moving forward, and the principal forgiveness provisions help local communities accomplish this work in difficult economic times.”

The Department of Environment and Conservation administers the SRF Loan Program for the state of Tennessee in conjunction with the Tennessee Local Development Authority.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides grants to fund the program, and the state provides a 20 percent match.  Loan repayments are returned to the program and are used to fund future SRF loans.

The funding order of projects is determined by the SRF Loan Program’s Priority Ranking Lists that rank potential projects according to the severity of their pollution and/or compliance problems or for the protection of public health.

Wastewater Loans were announced today for the following recipients:

  • Town of Carthage (Smith County) – The Town of Carthage will receive $625,000 for a Pump Station Rehabilitation/Replacement (Replace existing main pump station) project.  The project will be funded with a 20-year, $593,750 loan with an interest rate of 0.83% and $31,250 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.
  • City of Cleveland (Bradley County) – The City of Cleveland will receive $2,500,000 for a Water Meter Replacements project.  The project will be funded with a 20-year, $2,325,000 loan with an interest rate of 1.38% and $175,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.
  • City of Crossville (Cumberland County) – The City of Crossville will receive $1,950,000 for an Infiltration and Inflow Correction project that includes Dayton Ave/Oakmont Drive, Miller Ave/Harper Ln, and Holiday Drive Areas.  The project will be funded with a 20-year, $1,755,000 loan with an interest rate of 1.61% and $195,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.
  • Town of Erwin (Unicoi County) – The Town of Erwin will receive $4,000,000 for an Infiltration and Inflow Correction and WWTP Improvements project.  The project will be fundedwith a 30-year, $3,800,000 loan with an interest rate of 1.39% and $200,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.
  • City of Fayetteville (Lincoln County) – The City of Fayetteville will receive $4,000,000 for a WWTP Improvements project.  The project will be funded with a 20-year, $3,720,000 loan with an interest rate of 1.38% and $280,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.
  • City of Fayetteville (Lincoln County) – The City of Fayetteville will also receive an additional loan of $1,700,000 for the WWTP Improvements project.  This loan will be funded for a20 years term with an interest rate of 1.38% and will not include principal forgiveness.
  • Town of Oliver Springs (Anderson, Roane and Morgan Counties) – The Town of Oliver Springs will receive $3,458,000 for a WWTP Improvements project.  The project will be fundedwith a 20-year, $3,215,940 loan with an interest rate of 0.68% and $242,060 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.

A Drinking Water Loan was announced today for the following recipient:

  • Bloomingdale UD (Sullivan County) – The Bloomingdale UD will receive $2,200,000 for a Water System Improvements project.  The project will be funded with a 20-year, $1,430,000 loan with an interest rate of 0.91% and $770,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.

A traditional Drinking Water Loan was announced today for the following recipient:

  • Town of Livingston (Overton County) – Town of Livingston will receive an increase of $250,000 to an existing Water Treatment Improvements project. This loan will be funded for a20 years term with an interest rate of 1.64%.

Since its inception in 1987, Tennessee’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund Loan Program has awarded more than $1.6 billion in low-interest loans.  Since its inception in 1996, Tennessee’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Loan Program has awarded more than $252 million in low-interest loans.  Both programs combined award more than $80 million annually to Tennessee’s local governments for water and wastewater infrastructure projects.

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Haslam Announces Nearly $600K in TDOT, TDEC Grants for Hardin Co

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 23, 2014:

SAVANNAH – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced three grants totaling $585,517 to fund phase II of the Pedestrian Sidewalk Project in Savannah, improve the Hank DeBerry Complex, and make Savannah’s City Hall more energy efficient.

“These types of projects strengthen our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars. Making our cities and towns more pedestrian friendly and improving our recreation areas improves the lives of Tennesseans. We want Tennessee to continue to be the very best place to live, work and raise a family, and projects like these are key to making that a reality.”

A $243,913 transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund phase II of the Pedestrian Sidewalk Project in Savannah, including construction of sidewalks on the east side of Tennessee Street from the southwest corner of the new Tennessee Street Park to Main Street. Sidewalks will also be installed along the north side of Main Street from the downtown district to Hogohegee Drive, which will connect the historic Cherry Street Mansion and the Tennessee River Overlook.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement and is administered by TDOT. A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A $250,000 Local Park and Recreation Fund grant from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for Hardin County and the city of Savannah will be used at the Hank DeBerry Complex to remove existing poles and fixtures at the ball fields and make upgrades to underground wiring and electrical panels to accommodate new energy efficient lights.

A $91,604 Clean Energy Grant from TDEC will be used to make Savannah’s City Hall more energy efficient by installing energy efficient ceiling lights, replacing 10 HVAC units with an energy efficiency of SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) 13, reconstructing a 4,600 square foot section of flat roof with energy saving materials to reduce energy consumption for heating and cooling purposes, and constructing vestibules at the main three entrances to City Hall. The total estimated annual energy usage reduction is estimated to be 27,601 kWh, which is equivalent to 19.5 metric tons of greenhouse gas reductions. The estimated yearly savings for the upgrades will be approximately $3,126.

“From land acquisitions for new municipal parks to renovating and improving existing facilities, these grants help expand recreational opportunities for Tennessee citizens,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We are always looking for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency, and these investments in our local communities help improve the quality of life for all Tennesseans.”

The Local Park and Recreation Fund is a 23-year-old state program that provides local governments with resources to support development and improvements to local parks, greenways, trails and recreational facilities. Grant recipients were selected through competitive scoring with careful consideration given to the projects that met the selection criteria and expressed the greatest local recreation need. All LPRF grants require a 50 percent match by the recipient.

Clean Tennessee Energy Grants were established by the Haslam administration in 2012 to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and other private and public organizations across Tennessee. These grants support projects designed to reduce air emissions, improve energy efficiency and create cost savings.

Sen. Dolores Gresham (R-Somerville) and Rep. Vance Dennis (R-Savannah) represent Hardin County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

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Haslam Announces $587K in Grants for Waynesboro, Wayne Co

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 17, 2014:

WAYNESBORO – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced two grants totaling more than $587,000 for downtown revitalization in Wayne County and energy efficiency improvements at the Green River Surface Water Treatment Plant in Waynesboro.

“These types of projects are critical to strengthening our communities,” Haslam said. “Increasing energy efficiencies saves taxpayer dollars and reduces air emissions and creating a more pedestrian-oriented environment improves our cities’ and towns’ livability and quality of life for Tennesseans.”

A $23,600 Clean Tennessee Energy Grant to the City of Waynesboro from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) will support energy efficiency improvements at the Green River Surface Water Treatment Plant. This project will upgrade the control of four existing pump motors to allow more uniform pumping into the distribution system due to the large swing in day-to-day demands on the system. These improvements to the plant’s pump motors will create annual savings on the city’s power bill, and decreased electricity demand will also improve air quality by reducing emissions of nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide at the power generation stations.

“We are pleased to help the City of Waynesboro become more energy efficient,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said. “We continue to look for ways to promote environmental awareness and energy efficiency within state government and within Tennessee’s communities.”

A $563,992 transportation alternative grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will fund Phase I of the Downtown Revitalization Project in Wayne County. The project includes replacing existing curbing, sidewalks, and pedestrian lighting and is located along the perimeter of the Wayne County Courthouse on US 64. The entrances and exits to the square parking area will also be relocated, creating a much safer crossing for pedestrians, and new landscaping and trees will be planted throughout the project area.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally funded program formerly known as transportation enhancement, and is administered by TDOT.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $306 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A variety of activities, such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects, are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

State Sen. Joey Hensley (R-Hohenwald) and Rep. Vance Dennis (R-Savannah) represent Wayne County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

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Haslam Presents Pikeville with $250K Clean TN Energy Grant

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 8, 2013:

PIKEVILLE, Tenn. – Governor Bill Haslam and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Commissioner Bob Martineau announced today a grant to help fund energy conservation improvements in Bledsoe County.

The City of Pikeville was awarded a $250,000 Clean Tennessee Energy Grant to install new windows, lighting, HVAC systems, and insulation at the old Pikeville Elementary School. This project is an essential first step towards retrofitting the old school and bringing it online as the new Pikeville Municipal Complex that will house the city’s municipal offices, police department, courtroom, community kitchen, and training facilities to aid with workforce development and industrial recruitment.

“I want to applaud Pikeville for its commitment to implementing energy efficient practices,” Haslam said. “Reducing our environmental impact helps us protect our great state for future generations while reducing costs for Tennessee taxpayers.”

This project is estimated to reduce electricity demand by 54,625 kilowatt hours annually and save the city more than $10,000 annually. This decrease in energy use will be a positive environmental benefit as it reduces air emissions of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide.

Clean Tennessee Energy Grants are awarded to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and other private and public organizations across Tennessee. Clean Tennessee Energy Grants support projects designed to reduce air emissions, improve energy efficiency and create cost savings. Eligible categories of the Clean Tennessee Energy Grant Program include:

  • Energy Conservation – lighting, HVAC improvements, improved fuel efficiency, insulation, idling minimization
  • Air Quality Improvement – reduction in greenhouse gases, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds, oxides of nitrogen, hazardous air pollutants
  • Cleaner Alternative Energy – biomass, geothermal, solar, wind

Funding for the project comes from an April 2011 Clean Air Act settlement with the Tennessee Valley Authority. Under the Consent Decree, Tennessee will receive $26.4 million over five years to fund clean air programs in the state (at approximately $5.25 million per year). Since 2012, the program has provided $11,851,480 in financial assistance through 67 grants to state and local government agencies, state colleges and universities, utility districts, and quasi-government entities in Tennessee to purchase, install and construct energy projects. The maximum grant amount per project is $250,000 and requires match from the applicant. Grant recipients were chosen based on the careful consideration to meet the selection criteria and for those projects that expressed the greatest need.

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TN Awards More Than $5.7 M in Loans for Water, Wastewater Infrastructure Improvements

Press release from the office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; November 1, 2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau announced today that two communities, one utility district and one water/wastewater authority have been approved to receive more than $5.7 million in low-interest loans for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.

“Making needed infrastructure improvements to address drinking water and wastewater needs will benefit the health of communities and economic growth, and I’m pleased to see local governments taking advantage of this resource,” Haslam said.

The State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan Program provides low-interest loans that help communities, utility districts, and water and wastewater authorities finance projects that protect Tennessee’s ground and surface waters and public health. Loans are used to finance the planning, design and construction of water and wastewater facilities.

Through the SRF Program, communities, utility districts, and water and wastewater authorities can obtain loans with lower interest rates than most can obtain through private financing. Interest rates for loans can vary from zero percent to market rate based on each community’s economic index. Loans utilizing the 2012 EPA grant funds include a principal forgiveness component for water and wastewater projects.

“The State Revolving Fund Loan Program is a key investment for local communities in maintaining environmental and public health, while preparing for future needs,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said.

The Department of Environment and Conservation administers the SRF Loan Program for the state of Tennessee in conjunction with the Tennessee Local Development Authority. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides grants to fund the program, and the state provides a 20 percent match. Loan repayments are returned to the program and are used to fund future SRF loans.

The funding order of projects is determined by the SRF Loan Program’s Priority Ranking Lists that rank potential projects according to the severity of their pollution and/or compliance problems or for the protection of public health.

The loans announced today are:

Wastewater Loan:

  • City of Cowan (Franklin County) – The City of Cowan will receive $500,000 for a project that includes wastewater treatment plant improvements. The project will be funded with a 20-year, $400,000 loan with an interest rate of 0.17 percent and $100,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.

Drinking Water Loan:

  • Cordell Hull Utility District (Smith County) – The Cordell Hull UD will receive $500,000 for a project that includes replacement of the existing 100,000 gallon storage tank with a new 250,000 gallon storage tank. The project will be funded with a 20-year, $400,000 loan with an interest rate of 0.92 percent and $100,000 in principal forgiveness that will not have to be repaid.

Traditional Wastewater Loan:

  • Jackson Energy Authority (Gibson County) – The Jackson Energy Authority will receive an increase of $3,953,352 to an existing $5 million, 20-year loan which brings the total to $8,953,352 with an interest rate of 0.34% for a project that includes sewer system rehabilitation.

Traditional Drinking Water Loan:

  • City of Ridgely (Lake County) – The city of Ridgely will receive an $810,000, 20-year loan with an interest rate of 0.01 percent for replacement of two existing wells with two new wells.

Since its inception in 1987, Tennessee’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund Loan Program has awarded more than $1.5 billion in low-interest loans. Since its inception in 1996, Tennessee’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Loan Program has awarded more than $217 million in low-interest loans. Both programs combined award more than $80 million annually to Tennessee’s local governments for water and wastewater infrastructure projects.

Any local government interested in the SRF Loan Program should contact the State Revolving Fund Loan Program, Tennessee Tower, 12th Floor, 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue, Nashville, TN 37243, or call (615) 532-0445. Additional information about the SRF Loan Program may be found online at http://www.tn.gov/environment/water/fund.shtml.

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Johnsonville State Historic Park Receives $7K Grant from Dupont Corp

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 26, 2013:

NEW JOHNSONVILLE, Tenn. – Johnsonville State Historic Park announced today that, through their friends group, the park has received a $7,000 community support grant from Dupont Corporation in New Johnsonville.

Grant funds will be used to enhance interpretive programming at Johnsonville and assist in the reconstruction of Civil War-period soldier huts, similar to those that housed Union soldiers at the Johnsonville supply depot from 1863-1865. The reproduction soldier huts will serve as an interpretive visual aid and offer park visitors an authentic picture of soldier life at Johnsonville during the Civil War.

Johnsonville State Historic Park created a permanent Civil War living history group in February, portraying Union soldier life. Volunteer Civil War re-enactors and park employees from various Tennessee State Parks gather three times a year to recreate life as army soldiers in the 43rd Wisconsin Infantry and 1st Kansas Artillery Battery. The special weekend events will feature both infantry and artillery demonstrations for the general public. In addition to the three annual events, the park will also conduct regular living history programs, beginning with school groups this fall.

Since 2011, Johnsonville has received two grants from the Tennessee Wars Commission, a $9,000 grant for the purchase of 13 new outdoor interpretive exhibit panels for the Battle of Johnsonville and a $15,000 grant for the purchase of reproduction Civil War cannons that will assist in interpreting Johnsonville’s significance as a base for artillery. In addition, New Johnsonville’s Dupont Corporation awarded a $4,000 community support grant in 2012 for trail improvements and interpretive programming.

Johnsonville recently applied for a $50,000 American Battlefield Protection Program grant. If awarded, funds will be used to develop a Preservation and Interpretive Master Plan that will assist in preparing for Johnsonville’s future as a premiere Civil War destination.

The park will host its annual Battle of Johnsonville commemorative event November 2-3, 2013 at the original Civil War site, which is located 2.5 miles from the park’s welcome center. For a complete schedule of commemorative activities, visit www.tnstateparks.com/Johnsonville or contact 931-535-2789.

Located off U.S. Highway 70, Johnsonville State Historic Park is named for Military Governor Andrew Johnson. This 1,200-acre park, on the eastern side of Kentucky Lake, encompasses and overlooks the site of the Battle of Johnsonville. On November 4, 1864, Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry took up artillery positions on the west bank of the Tennessee River. Calvary forces under Forrest who had already sunk four Union gunboats downstream, opened fire on the depot from across the river and proceeded to set fire to and sink numerous Federal riverboats in their moorings. Confederate gunfire resulted in the burning of the supply depot, destroying millions of dollars’ worth of Union Army stores. Two large artillery redoubts and other surviving fortifications can be visited at the park. Johnsonville also offers eight miles of hiking trails and a picnic area.

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Haslam Announces $800K in Recreational Trail Grants for Dresden, Martin

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 25, 2013:

DRESDEN – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced three grants totaling nearly $800,000 for Dresden and Martin to lengthen and develop recreational trails connecting the communities with the downtowns.

“These greenways and trails not only enhance the pedestrian experience of our communities, but they also provide new recreational and healthy ways for Tennesseans to enjoy their neighborhoods,” Haslam said. “Downtowns are the heart of our cities and towns, and the projects announced today will make important connections between various destinations and the Dresden and Martin downtowns.”

Dresden is receiving a $199,968 Recreational Trails Program (RTP) grant from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) as well as a $399,706 grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) to dedicate property as park land and convert a former railroad line into a multimodal pedestrian and cycling trail that connects to the heart of downtown Dresden.

Phase I of the Dresden Green Rail Trail project is located southeast of the Farmer’s Market trailhead at Linden Street and will connect to the Festival Park trail head south of Evergreen Street. It includes a ten-foot wide paved trail, decorative gateway entrances, landscaping, and park benches, bicycle racks and signage.

Martin is receiving a $200,000 RTP grant to extend the current Brian Brown Greenway to downtown Martin by constructing a multi-use trail approximately 3,000 feet long and 10 feet wide.

“We are excited to have this additional funding opportunity, which will assist the cities of Martin and Dresden in the development of a variety of new trails,” TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau said.

The Recreational Trails Program is a federally-funded program established to distribute funding for motorized, non-motorized and diverse recreation trail projects. Recreational Trails Program grants may be used for non-routine maintenance and restoration of existing trails, development and rehabilitation, trailside or trailhead facilities such as restrooms, kiosks and parking lots, construction of new trails and land acquisition for recreational trails or corridors.

The transportation alternative grant is made possible through a federally-funded program administered by TDOT.

“Through these grants, TDOT has funded more than $294 million in non-traditional transportation projects,” TDOT Commissioner John Schroer said. “This program has assisted communities all over the state in their efforts to revitalize downtowns, highlight historic areas, provide alternative means of transportation, and increase opportunities for economic development.”

A variety of activities such as the restoration of historic facilities, bike and pedestrian trails, landscaping and other non-traditional transportation projects are eligible for grant funds under the federal program.

State Sen. John Stevens (R-Huntington) and state Rep. Andy Holt (R-Dresden) represent Weakley County in the Tennessee General Assembly.

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Haslam Announces Waste Management Grants for Development Districts

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 16, 2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau announced today nearly $304,000 in grants to support solid waste management activities in communities across Tennessee.

The Tennessee General Assembly established development districts in 1966 to do general and comprehensive planning and conduct development and administration activities for local governments, and the state’s nine development districts will receive grants totaling $303,674 in fiscal year 2013-2014.

“I appreciate the role Tennessee’s development districts play in supporting local communities and municipalities as they work together to manage and reduce solid waste,” Haslam said. “We are pleased to support these critical efforts and help fund projects for all nine districts in the upcoming fiscal year.”

Tennessee’s development districts assist the state’s solid waste planning regions in compiling information about landfills, source reduction, composting and recycling for the state’s Annual Progress Report. The report is a planning and reporting tool required by the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991, which was the first comprehensive solid waste planning legislation in Tennessee history. The data is used to determine each region’s progress towards Tennessee’s goal to achieve 25 percent waste reduction in Class I landfill solid waste.

Local governments also receive technical assistance from development districts in designing, implementing, upgrading and maintaining solid waste programs, systems and facilities, including landfills, convenience centers and recycling centers.

“The ongoing support of Tennessee’s development district offices is vital to the state’s long-term waste reduction planning and these resources are available to help support the important functions that advance those solid waste management goals,” Martineau said.

Grant amounts are determined on an annual basis and awarded based on available funding and the scope of work undertaken by each district. The grants announced today include:

  • East Tennessee Development District                        $28,844
  • First Tennessee Development District                       $36,400
  • Greater Nashville Regional Council                             $37,042
  • Memphis Area Association of Government                $22,575
  • Northwest Tennessee Development District             $44,825
  • Southwest Tennessee Development District             $28,350
  • Upper Cumberland Development District                 $33,708
  • South Central Tennessee Development District       $41,330
  • Southeast Tennessee Development District              $30,600

Development District grants were authorized by the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991 and are supported from the Solid Waste Management Fund that is administered by the Department of Environment and Conservation. The Solid Waste Management Fund receives its revenues from a tipping fee surcharge on each ton of solid waste disposed in Class I landfills and from a pre-disposal fee on new tires sold in the state.

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National Historic Register Adds 3 TN Sites

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 9, 2013:

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Historical Commission announced three Tennessee sites have been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The National Register of Historic Places is the nation’s official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation. It is part of a nationwide program that coordinates and supports efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic resources. The Tennessee Historical Commission administers the program in Tennessee.

“The National Register honors places that help Tennesseans understand our heritage and what makes our communities unique and enjoyable,” said Patrick McIntyre, executive director of the Tennessee Historical Commission. “We are confident this recognition will help retain these unique sites for future generations to know and appreciate.”

Sites recently added to the National Register of Historic Places include:

American Baptist Theological Seminary – Located in Nashville, the American Baptist Theological Seminary Historic District has statewide importance in the areas of African American heritage as it relates to education, religion and the Civil Rights Movement. Now known as the American Baptist College, three historic buildings comprise the historic district. These are the 1924 Griggs Hall, the 1947 J.B. Lawrence Administration Building and the 1954 T.L. Holcomb Library. The college emphasized a Christian education and racial equality that would result in advancing the Nashville Student Movement. John Lewis, Bernard Lafayette, C.T. Vivian and James Bevel were all students at the college who became prominent in the Civil Rights Movement. Most events of the Civil Rights Movement took place elsewhere in Nashville, but the foundation for these events was cultivated in the college.

Hawthorne Hill – Constructed circa 1805, Hawthorne Hill is located near Castalian Springs in Sumner County. The two-story building has Federal-style details seen in the symmetrical façade entrance with transom and interior woodwork. In addition to being important for its architecture, Hawthorne Hill is a noteworthy representation of settlement and exploration patterns in the region. The property was historically part of a 208-acre farm owned by Colonel Humphrey Bate. Today the property consists of 10.45 acres and contains the house, a 20th century barn, a 20th century shed, a historic cemetery and a circa 1805 cistern. The property was purchased by the state in 2007 and it will eventually be opened as one of the Tennessee Historical Commission’s state-owned historic sites.

Rosemark Historic District – The community of Rosemark in Shelby County is an excellent example of an agricultural community that developed because of cotton farming and ginning in the 19th century and adapted to diversified agriculture in the 20th century. Of the 36 principal resources in the district, 24 are residences, two are churches, two are industrial buildings and eight are community buildings. The majority of the buildings in the district were constructed before 1920 and reflect the community’s greatest period of growth. Architecturally, the district is important for the late 19th century and early 20th century mixture of vernacular architecture seen in the principal buildings and the outbuildings associated with them. It is one of the few intact rural communities in the county.

Links to each of the completed nomination forms can be found in the site descriptions listed above. For more information about the National Register of Historic Places or the Tennessee Historical Commission, please visit the website at www.tnhistoricalcommission.org.

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Haslam Awards $3.6 M in Waste Tire Recycling Grants

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation; July 8 ,2013:

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau today announced 44 grants to help Tennessee communities recycle tires and reduce the number going to landfills.

The waste tire recycling grants total more than $3.6 million in fiscal year 2014-15, and the grants are supported from the Solid Waste Management Fund, which receives revenue from a pre-disposal fee on the purchase of new tires.

Tennessee recycles an estimated 55,000 tons of tires per year, diverting waste tires from landfills and sending them to beneficial end-use facilities. Beneficial end-use methods include utilizing tire-derived aggregate in civil engineering projects, crumb rubber for asphalt paving and molded rubber products. The majority of Tennessee’s waste tires are used as tire-derived fuel.

“The keys to this program’s success are the efforts of our local county and community partners,” Haslam said. “Reducing the number of tires in landfills and redirecting the tires to a better use helps conserve Tennessee’s natural resources for future generations.”

The General Assembly authorized waste tire grants in the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991. The grants assist counties with the collection, processing and transportation of the tires to beneficial end-use facilities. Counties are reimbursed $1 per eligible tire and are required to provide at least one waste tire collection site. Counties may charge an additional fee if the grant is not adequate to cover costs.

The fund is administered by the Department of Environment and Conservation, and $1.25 from the $1.35 pre-disposal fee collected is used to supplement the counties’ costs for waste tire recycling and services.

Tire-derived fuel, or TDF, conserves fossil fuels and provides a waste-to-energy disposal method. The energy value of TDF exceeds the value of other solid fuels such as coal. According to a study by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, TDF used in a properly designed and maintained combustion device emits fewer pollutants than conventional fossil fuels. In Tennessee, Abitibi Bowater Corporation, Packaging Corporation of America, Cemex Cement, Buzzi Unicem USA, and Gerdau Ameristeel are among those utilizing processed waste tires for fuel or as a source of carbon in their manufacturing process.

“The Solid Waste Management Fund continues to provide support to Tennessee communities and it’s important that local county governments continue to focus on waste reduction as part of their overall waste management plan,” added Martineau.

Purchasing longer life tires, rotating and balancing tires every 6,000 miles, and checking air pressure monthly are excellent ways to reduce the number of scrap tires generated in Tennessee and will also save money. For more information on Tennessee’s Waste Tire Program, please visit www.tn.gov/environment/swm/tires. A complete list of the grant awards is available in the attached release.