Categories
Press Releases

Haslam Thanks Pro-Life Women For Protecting Unborn

Press Release from Bill Haslam for Governor, March 31, 2010:

KNOXVILLE – Republican gubernatorial candidate and Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam released the following statement after attending the Pro-Life Women’s Day on the Hill rally in Nashville today:

“As someone committed to the rights of the unborn, I applaud the efforts of Tennessee Right to Life and the Pro-Life Women’s Day on the Hill to end the practice of abortions in Tennessee. I believe in the sanctity of every human life, and as governor, I will continue to support the Pro-Life efforts and will make sure that no tax dollars go to funding abortions.”

To view Mayor Haslam’s new television ad, which focuses on his personal, spiritual and civic life, please visit his blog at blog.billhaslam.com.

Bill Haslam is the two-term Mayor of Knoxville, re-elected in 2007 with 87% of the vote. A hardworking, conservative public servant, he led Knoxville to become one of the top ten metropolitan areas for business and expansion, while reducing the city’s debt, tripling the rainy day fund, and bringing property taxes to the lowest rate in 50 years. An executive leader with a proven record of success, he helped grow his family’s small business from 800 employees into one of Tennessee’s largest companies with 14,000 employees. His combination of executive and public service experience makes him uniquely qualified to be Tennessee’s next Governor. Haslam is the right person at the right time to lead Tennessee.

Bill and Crissy Haslam have two daughters, Annie and Leigh, and a son, Will, who resides in Knoxville with his wife, Hannah.

For more information on Bill Haslam, please visit www.BillHaslam.com.

Categories
Press Releases

Haslam Announces Element Of Small Business Works Campaign

Press Release from Bill Haslam for Governor, March 26, 2010:

Initiative will focus on matchmaking and growth opportunities for Tennessee businesses

KINGSPORT – Republican gubernatorial candidate and Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam announced plans today to launch the “Tennessee First” initiative to create jobs by identifying the fastest growing companies in Tennessee and connecting them to in-state small businesses and regions ripe for economic development.

Speaking at an economic development roundtable in Northeast Tennessee as a part of his statewide Jobs Tour, Mayor Haslam expanded on his earlier announcement of a campaign to promote entrepreneurship and job growth in Tennessee through a focused effort on small businesses.

“Tennessee First is a significant piece of the puzzle and will be a critical step towards making Tennessee the No. 1 state in the Southeast for high quality jobs,” said Haslam.

“Throughout the Jobs Tour, I’ve heard over and over from local business owners: at the same time we’re recruiting outside businesses to invest in Tennessee for the first time, we should be doing all we can to promote job retention and expansion at the companies that are already here,” Haslam said.

The Small Business Works initiative will involve working alongside small business owners to create the best possible environment for starting or growing a business in Tennessee, while enhancing the state’s efforts to provide useful, timely information and guidance to anyone seeking to start a business here.

As an extension of Small Business Works, “Tennessee First” will include a concentrated effort to identify the 100 fastest growing businesses in Tennessee and connect them to relevant small businesses for matchmaking opportunities as well as provide technical support to the small businesses. The initiative will also utilize the regional jobs base camps Mayor Haslam intends to create by working to identify areas for businesses to expand or “outsource” operations within the state.

“There needs to be a strategic effort to evaluate the strengths and opportunities we have with existing Tennessee businesses and do more to promote matchmaking and growth within our state,” continued Haslam.

“When a Tennessee company is looking for a supplier for a particular good or service, we should make sure they can easily connect with another Tennessee business that can provide it,” Haslam said.

Mayor Haslam is spending Week Three of his three-week, statewide Jobs Tour in East Tennessee, and today he is touring Sullivan, Washington, and Hamblen counties. Friday’s events include a small business roundtable, facility tours, meetings with economic development professionals, and knocking on neighborhood doors. The remainder of the schedule for the East Tennessee swing of the Jobs Tour can be found below.

Bill Haslam is the two-term Mayor of Knoxville, re-elected in 2007 with 87% of the vote. A hardworking, conservative public servant, he led Knoxville to become one of the top ten metropolitan areas for business and expansion, while reducing the city’s debt, tripling the rainy day fund, and bringing property taxes to the lowest rate in 50 years. An executive leader with a proven record of success, he helped grow his family’s small business from 800 employees into one of Tennessee’s largest companies with 14,000 employees. His combination of executive and public service experience makes him uniquely qualified to be Tennessee’s next Governor. Bill is the right person at the right time to lead Tennessee.

Bill and Crissy Haslam have two daughters, Annie and Leigh, and a son, Will, who resides in Knoxville with his wife, Hannah.

For more information on Bill Haslam, please visit www.BillHaslam.com. To follow Mayor Haslam on his Jobs Tour and submit ideas for how to grow our state’s economy, please visit www.Jobs4TN.com.

Categories
News Transparency and Elections

Gibbons: I Didn’t Have Enough Money

Officially bowing out of the GOP race for governor, Bill Gibbons said he never really had enough campaign cash to make a solid run at the Republican nomination.

Citing the lack of funds as his “only reason” for dropping out of the race, Gibbons said he probably lost his bid within the first 60 days of his candidacy.

“We were really behind the curve from day one,” said Gibbons in a Downtown Nashville press conference Friday. “To some degree, maybe we lost this campaign in the first 60 days because we were just not ready to hit the ground running on that fund raising.”

Gibbons was one of four remaining candidates running in the Republican primary election slated for Aug. 5. His fund raising was well behind those of his opponents, especially Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam’s, whose personal wealth from the Pilot Oil family business was a constant target of criticism from the Shelby County prosecutor. Haslam had $4.2 million in the bank as of March 22.

As of Feb. 25, Gibbons had $245,562.64 in his campaign fund.

Gibbons said he lacked a statewide fund raising network. While his roots, name recognition and support was strong down in Memphis, he said, he struggled to drum up support in the rest of the state.

Gibbons added that he does not foresee running again for governor. Were he to do it all over again, Gibbons said he would have begun raising money about a year before announcing he was officially seeking the seat.

Now that Gibbons is officially out of the race, there are no remaining gubernatorial candidates from the Memphis area. Sen. Jim Kyle, a Memphis Democrat who serves as the party’s leader in the Senate, dropped out last month.

Gibbons said he wasn’t sure if he would endorse any of his former gubernatorial opponents.

Andrea Zelinski can be reached at andreazelinski@tnreport.com.

Categories
Press Releases

Haslam Statement on Gibbons Leaving Guv’s Race

Press Release from Bill Haslam for Governor, March 26, 2010:

KNOXVILLE – Republican gubernatorial candidate and Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam released the following statement on Shelby County District Attorney Bill Gibbons’ announcement that he will not continue his run for governor:

“Bill Gibbons is a highly respected public servant who has been an important candidate in the campaign for governor. His passion for Memphis and issues surrounding public safety and crime has added much to the campaign conversation and discussion. I appreciate his candidacy and I look forward to his continued leadership in West Tennessee and across the state.”

Bill Haslam is the two-term Mayor of Knoxville, re-elected in 2007 with 87% of the vote. A hardworking, conservative public servant, he led Knoxville to become one of the top ten metropolitan areas for business and expansion, while reducing the city’s debt, tripling the rainy day fund, and bringing property taxes to the lowest rate in 50 years.

An executive leader with a proven record of success, he helped grow his family’s small business from 800 employees into one of Tennessee’s largest companies with 14,000 employees. His combination of executive and public service experience makes him uniquely qualified to be Tennessee’s next Governor. Bill is the right person at the right time to lead Tennessee.

Bill and Crissy Haslam have two daughters, Annie and Leigh, and a son, Will, who resides in Knoxville with his wife, Hannah.

For more information on Bill Haslam, please visit www.BillHaslam.com.

Categories
Press Releases

Official Statement: Gibbons Drops Out Of Guv’s Race

Press Release from Bill Gibbons for Governor, March 26, 2010:

Today, I am withdrawing from the race for governor for one reason and one reason only, and that is lack of sufficient campaign funds to go forward.

For over a year, we have had a specific campaign plan which called for a budget of $2.5 million – substantially less than what one other campaign will spend and at least slightly less than what two others will probably spend. Our initial goal was to have at least $1.0 million of that by the end of 2009. We fell significantly short of that goal. We then set a goal of having at least $1 million by April 1 of this year. It is obvious at this point that we will not achieve that. Our balance on hand has gone down rather than up since our last disclosure in early February. We have no reasonable prospect of paying for any media campaign, a necessity for success in this race.

I had hoped to achieve our financial needs by convincing enough people that this campaign was an opportunity to invest in a movement to tackle the big challenges our state faces of reducing our crime rate, improving our schools, and creating a better climate for more good paying jobs. Those are challenges that are especially critical to my home community of Memphis. My primary responsibility was to successfully convince enough people to make that investment. To the extent we failed, it was my failure.

Since State Senator Jim Kyle and I have both withdrawn from the race, we have no candidate from my own community of Memphis and Shelby County or who understands personally its unique needs and opportunities. We have crime driven by gang activity and drug trafficking which cries out for changes in our state sentencing laws. We have one of the largest urban school systems in the nation with the urgent need for reform. The University of Memphis is a unique urban research university which is being overlooked by state government and deserves its own independent governing board. And state government needs to end its neglect of the University of Tennessee Center for Health Sciences and The MED. I hope the other candidates of both parties will work to learn more about the community I love.

I thank the hundreds of people who did join me in this effort. Many are old friends. Others are new friends I made during the course of the campaign. I will be forever indebted to their support and friendship.

Although raising money has proved most difficult, an extremely heartening aspect of this experience has been the willingness of people across the state who care about its future to give their support and their time to my candidacy. They have reinforced my own faith in the political process.

I commend the campaign staff. I could not have asked for a more talented group of individuals. And I thank my family for their support and tolerance of the many hours I spent on the campaign trail. Frankly, one plus to ending the campaign is that I will be able to spend more time with my wife Julia who has been unable to participate because she is a federal judge.

I’m looking forward to continuing my service as district attorney in Shelby County, our state’s largest jurisdiction. I’m honored to serve with many dedicated public servants. I’ll go to work every day determined to make my community an even better place in which to live. And I will continue to push aggressively for needed changes at the state level in our criminal justice system.

A statewide campaign in Tennessee is not for the faint-hearted. It is both physically and emotionally demanding. I wish the other candidates of both parties well in the coming months. I urge them to focus on the real challenges our state faces and to be bold in proposing ways to meet those challenges.

Categories
Press Releases

Statement By Wamp on Gibbons’ Withdrawl From Guv’s Race

Press Release from Zach Wamp for Governor, March 26, 2010:

“Bill Gibbons is as an outstanding leader, and he has become a very good friend over the course of this campaign. I have always found Bill to be a tough, but very friendly and fair competitor, who has always been sincere and committed in his efforts to find real solutions to the real problems facing the people of our great state.

And like me, Bill has always had the guts, strength and conviction to stand up to the big money and the special interests and to just tell it like it is. So while Bill will be missed out on the campaign trail – his ideas and his leadership will continue. And I intend to work extra hard to earn both Bill’s support and that of his many supporters as we work together now to create an even better Tennessee.”

Categories
Featured News Transparency and Elections

Mumpower Moving On

Republican Leader Jason Mumpower, a key figure in delivering the GOP its historic majority status in the state House, surprised much of the Capitol on Thursday by announcing he will not seek reelection this fall.

For Mumpower, from Bristol, it was a stunning turn, since he was within one vote only a year ago of becoming speaker of the House, edged out in a striking maneuver when Republican Kent Williams of Elizabethton made a deal with 49 Democrats to make Williams speaker instead.

That vote jolted the other House Republicans and denied Mumpower the speaker’s gavel many had assumed he would be taking. The Republicans had gained a 50-49 advantage in the House in the 2008 elections, creating the party’s first majority in both the House and Senate since Reconstruction.

Mumpower said Thursday after the House adjourned for the day that last year’s vote on a speaker had nothing to do with his decision now to leave after serving 14 years.

“That’s old news,” he said. “It is what it is. That has nothing to do with it. My decision has everything to do with what is right for me and right for my family.”

He said his focus now will be on legislative work and the upcoming election season.

“The time was right,” Mumpower said. “It’s always best to leave the party early.

“This hasn’t been an easy decision. This has been one I’ve come to know is the right decision. What I’m going to do at this point is finish this session, leading this caucus in an aggressive way to make sure that we accomplish a balanced budget with no new taxes. Then I’m going to leave this session and get out in the field and make sure we continue to grow and expand our Republican majority in the House.”

Mumpower mentioned “new challenges” in his future but he gave little hint as to what they might be. He did acknowledge a personal desire he and his wife have to have children.

“I’m 36 years old,” he said. “One thing I haven’t done yet is start a family.

“I think if I had chosen to run I would have been re-elected to my House seat and re-elected as House Republican leader and I think I stood a very good chance of being elected speaker. Ultimately, I made a different decision.”

He said he felt he was making the right decision.

“It’s a decision a member of the House has to make every two years, and if you look back at past election cycles, I’ve always had a tradition of filing my petition for re-election on or about (NASCAR) race weekend in Bristol, and that happened to be this past weekend.

“I’ve spent a lot of time this past weekend talking with my family and really came to the conclusion this past weekend that this was the right time for me.”

Mumpower said he would be active in working for Republican candidates.

“I’m going to work in many political campaigns across the state, helping Republicans get elected,” he said.

Rep. Glen Casada, R-Franklin, Republican caucus chairman, said he did not believe Mumpower’s departure was related to any disappointment about the speakership.

“Jason was a true leader. He’s a true friend, first and foremost,” Casada said. “He is a true Christian. He lived what he believed. He did an excellent job as majority leader, and he’s probably the fundamental reason why we are in the majority.”

Casada said he thought there were a lot of factors in Mumpower’s decision and that he thought Mumpower himself probably didn’t know what he wants to do away from the Legislature.

“I think he has served 14 years and he’s looking to do other things,” Casada said. “He’s been going back and forth 600 miles a week for 14 years. It’s just time to do something else.”

Rep. Mike Turner, D-Nashville, the Democratic caucus chairman, said he had heard rumors “a while ago” about a possible departure by Mumpower.

“I heard rumors. I hadn’t heard anything lately. I had kind of forgotten about it. Then I heard early this morning about it,” Turner said.

Turner and House Democratic leaders had locked horns earlier this week over controversial remarks Turner had made about reaction to the Obama health-care reform plan in Washington.

“Jason is a good man,” Turner said Thursday. “He’s a very intelligent man. He’s been a friend of mine for some time. We don’t always agree on a lot of things, but it doesn’t make him a bad person. I’m sure he’s going on to better things.”

Mumpower did not speculate on who might win his district seat.

“Fourteen years ago, the people of the 3rd Legislative District decided to take a chance on a skinny, 23-year-old kid, and I respected the judgment that they exercised then, and I’m going to respect the judgment they exercise now in choosing whomever they want to represent them,” Mumpower said.

“I will be working to ensure it is a Republican, because I think only a Republican will best reflect the values of the district I represent.”

When a reporter asked Mumpower for more specifics on what he will do next, Mumpower reiterated his intention to work for candidates.

“I’m not leaving the fight. After that, we’ll see. Maybe you need a camera man,” he said. “I’m going to see what’s out there. Whatever the case may be.”

Mumpower had been in the Legislature only a few years and was not very well known outside his district when state Republican Party members began to notice the strong approval ratings Mumpower had there.

He soon became recognized as a rising star in the House, and his ascension to the leader’s post followed. He looked primed to reach the top position in the chamber when the 106th General Assembly convened. Then came the dramatic vote that made Williams speaker.

As Mumpower waited patiently Thursday while members of the media gathered around his desk on the House floor for comments, moments after the day’s session had adjourned, a man stepped forward, said, “Jason,” reached out and shared a firm handshake with him, then walked out of the chamber. The man was Kent Williams.

Categories
Press Releases

Haslam Announces ‘Business Leaders For Haslam’ Coalition

Press Release from Bill Haslam for Governor, March 18, 2010:

Business leaders from across the state come together to back Knoxville Mayor’s gubernatorial run

KNOXVILLE – More than 200 business leaders from across Tennessee joined together today to endorse Republican gubernatorial candidate and Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam because they believe he has the proven executive experience and conservative fiscal leadership needed at this critical time.

“Bill Haslam is the only candidate in this race who has helped create thousands of jobs. First he grew and expanded the family business as President of Pilot Travel Centers, and then he recruited new jobs to Knoxville as Mayor. He understands how jobs are created,” said Allen Morgan of Memphis. “While other candidates are more concerned about gimmicks and concerts, Bill is focused on a three-week jobs tour. Tennesseans concerned about maintaining and recruiting jobs should enthusiastically support Mayor Haslam. I do.”

The announcement of “Business Leaders for Haslam” came during the second week of Haslam’s three-week Jobs Tour, and the coalition is a clear indication business leaders statewide know the two-term Mayor of Knoxville, who was reelected in 2007 with 87 percent of the vote, is the only candidate with proven experience at promoting business and growing and retaining jobs.

Republican candidates for governor say the first issue they hear about on the campaign trail is jobs, but Mayor Haslam is the only candidate making the focused effort to listen to small business owners and economic development leaders across the state and to share ideas about how to retain and grow good, well-paying jobs here in Tennessee.

Many Tennesseans also are concerned about the budget shortfalls that await the next governor and believe Bill Haslam is best suited to deal with those issues. “I have been impressed with Mayor Haslam’s stewardship of Knoxville. And he’s the only candidate in this race who has had to create and implement a budget, the same way he’ll have to do as governor,” said Newt Raff of Johnson City. “He’s the only candidate with that critical experience.”

Others are focused on the leadership qualities necessary to be governor. “Bill Haslam has the executive temperament to lead our state. We need a governor with a calm confidence and business experience, who understands the big issues facing Tennessee, and who knows when to listen and when to lead – that’s Bill Haslam,” commented Joe Decosimo of Chattanooga.

Still others focused on the importance of education to attracting and maintaining good jobs. “Improving our public education system is critically important to our long-term economic security,” said Tom Cigarran of Nashville. “Bill Haslam understands that education is key to attracting and maintaining good jobs.”

“Bill Haslam provides Tennesseans incredibly successful business and civic credentials wrapped around a genuine care for every single citizen in our state. That’s an absolute fact,” added Kitty Moon Emery of Nashville. “I feel strongly we’re at the right time with a perfect leader to successfully tackle the challenges ahead.”

“Crissy and I are incredibly grateful for the support we’ve received over the last 14 months,” Haslam said. “It’s support like this – for our plans such as creating jobs base camps and leveraging unique regional assets to create specific development strategies – that affirms we’re doing this for the right reasons: to strengthen our state and get Tennesseans working again.”

“Tennessee’s strength is in its communities, and we have a lot to sell here: no income tax, right to work, incredible natural beauty and a strong work ethic,” Haslam continued. “With the backing of these business leaders who contribute jobs and stability to our local economies, we can work to ensure that Tennessee becomes the No. 1 location in the Southeast for stable, well-paying jobs.”

A hardworking, conservative public servant, Haslam led Knoxville to become one of the top ten metropolitan areas for business and expansion, while reducing the city’s debt, tripling the rainy day fund, and bringing property taxes to the lowest rate in more than 50 years. An executive leader with a proven record of success, he helped grow his family’s small business from 800 employees into one of Tennessee’s largest companies with 14,000 employees. His combination of executive and public service experience makes him uniquely qualified to be Tennessee’s next Governor.

Bill and Crissy Haslam have two daughters, Annie and Leigh, and a son, Will, who resides in Knoxville with his wife, Hannah.

For more information on Bill Haslam’s Jobs Tour, please visit www.Jobs4TN.com, and for information on Bill and his campaign, please visit www.BillHaslam.com.

Business Leaders for Haslam Coalition

· Matt Alexander, Blount County

· Chris Allison, Madison County

· David Amonette, Sumner County

· Charlie Anderson, Jr., Knox County

· Leo Arnold, Dyer County

· Max Arnold, Carroll County

· Sammie Arnold, Madison County

· Tonya Arnold, Dyer County

· Billy Atkins, Montgomery County

· Adrian Bailey, Knox County

· Sharon Bailey, Knox County

· Marvin Baker, Smith County

· Lee Barfield, Davidson County

· Pete Barile, Hamblen County

· Jim Barrier, Maury County

· Steve Bates, Lewis County

· Sandy Beall, Knox County

· Keith Bell, Sumner County

· Gary Binkley, Cheatham County

· Jim Blalock, Sevier County

· Sid Blalock, Knox County

· Everett Bolin, Jr., Cumberland County

· Randal Boston, Cumberland County

· Keith Bowers, Sr., Carter County

· Chip Boyd, Washington County

· Randy Boyd, Knox County

· David Bradshaw, Anderson County

· Starr Bragg, Blount County

· Jim Bush, Knox County

· Harry Call, Knox County

· Donnie Cameron, Williamson County

· Mike Campbell, Knox County

· Steven Cannon, Williamson County

· Bob Card, Bradley County

· Herman Carrick, Sullivan County

· Bill Carroll, Sevier County

· Billy Carroll, Sevier County

· Rob Carter, Shelby County

· Steve Cates, Williamson County

· Matt Chambers, Knox County

· Charlie Chandler, Dyer County

· Brandon Cherry, Smith County

· Tom Cigarran, Davidson County

· Pete Claussen, Knox County

· Kevin Clayton, Blount County

· Robert Clear, Campbell County

· Noble Cody, Putnam County

· Scott Collins, Hancock County

· Evan Cope, Rutherford County

· Howard Cotter, Marion County

· Dan Crockett, Davidson County

· Ricky Crook, Hamilton County

· Milton Curtis, Sumner County

· Joe Davenport, Hamilton County

· Ron DeBerry, Sumner County

· Fred Decosimo, Hamilton County

· Joe Decosimo, Hamilton County

· William DeLay, Davidson County

· Michael Dumond, Perry County

· Harvey Durham, McNairy County

· Jonathan Edwards, Lawrence County

· Paul Ellis, Montgomery County

· Danny England, Claiborne County

· David England, Dickson County

· Tom Flynn, Cumberland County

· Darrell Freeman, Davidson County

· Bud Fultz, Rutherford County

· Sam Furrow, Knox County

· Buddy Gambill, Rutherford County

· Bill Giannini, Shelby County

· Mike Gibbs, Cheatham County

· Randy Gibson, Knox County

· Trow Gillespie, Shelby County

· Leigh Gillig, Williamson County

· Ann Gillis, Smith County

· Bill Greene, Carter County

· Gay Gregson, Madison County

· Hoy Grimm, Blount County

· Bill Hagerty, Davidson County

· John Haines, Cheatham County

· Danny Hale, Sumner County

· Jim Hamilton, Dyer County

· Mike Harris, Dyer County

· Melinda Headrick, Blount County

· Tom Hendricks, McNairy County

· Dean Higby, Rutherford County

· Randy Hodges, Knox County

· Randy Hoffman, Sumner County

· Tony Hollin, Knox County

· Tom Hooper, Haywood County

· Tom Hughes, McMinn County

· Glen Hutchinson, Rutherford County

· Orrin Ingram, Davidson County

· Jack Jarvis, Sullivan County

· Lance Jenkins, Bedford County

· Alex Johnson, Sevier County

· Greg Jones, Bedford County

· Bryan Jordan, Shelby County

· Raja Jubran, Knox County

· Bland Justis, Greene County

· Doug Kennedy, Knox County

· Bob Kenworthy, Henry County

· Chris Kinney, Knox County

· Angie Kirby, Blount County

· Maribel Koella, Knox County

· Wayne Kreis, Morgan County

· Eric Lambert, Sevier County

· Steve Land, Knox County

· Greer Lashlee, Gibson County

· T.O. Lashlee, Gibson County

· Rodney Lawler, Knox County

· Fred Lawson, Blount County

· Gigi Lazenby, Davidson County

· Ted Lazenby, Davidson County

· Bill Lee, Williamson County

· Terry Leonard, Greene County

· Buddy Liner, McMinn County

· Mike Magill, Anderson County

· Boyce Magli, Williamson County

· Brad Martin, Shelby County

· Larry Masters, Jefferson County

· Fiona McAnally, Knox County

· Rob McCabe, Davidson County

· Dale McCulloch, Wilson County

· Mike McGuffin, Davidson County

· Stuart McWhorter, Davidson County

· Tommy Mitchell, Houston County

· Jeff Monson, Sevier County

· Kitty Moon Emery, Davidson County

· Danny Moore, Crockett County

· Lewis Moorer, Jr., Davidson County

· Mike Mortimer, Lewis County

· Cynthia Moxley, Knox County

· Doug Muech, Henry County

· Lyle Mullins, Hancock County

· Bill Newsom, Dyer County

· Scott Niswonger, Greene County

· Jerry O’Connor, Unicoi County

· Linda Ogle, Sevier County

· Joe Orgill, Shelby County

· Kevin Painter, Blount County

· Greg Petty, Dyer County

· Teddy Phillips, Jr., Knox County

· Victor Pike, Dyer County

· Johnny Pitts, Shelby County

· John Pontius, Shelby County

· Aubrey Preston, Williamson County

· Ben Probasco, Hamilton County

· Scotty Probasco, Hamilton County

· Sharon Pryse, Knox County

· Newt Raff, Washington County

· Brian Ragan, Dickson County

· Carroll Richardson, Sullivan County

· Don Ridley, Hawkins County

· Matt Riggsbee, Crockett County

· Jerry Riley, Sr., Crockett County

· Jerry Riley, Jr., Crockett County

· Joe Riley, McMinn County

· John Roberts, Coffee County

· Kenneth Roberts, Robertson County

· Richard Roberts, Greene County

· Don Rogers, Hamblen County

· Paul Rose, Tipton County

· John Ross, Gibson County

· Bill Sansom, Knox County

· Ricky Sanders, Crockett County

· John Santi, Shelby County

· Nate Schott, Rutherford County

· Brenda Sellers, Blount County

· Jerry Sharber, Williamson County

· Richard Sheperd, Blount County

· Susan Simons, Davidson County

· Bill Sinks, Sumner County

· Jerry Smith, McMinn County

· Reese Smith, Williamson County

· Steve Smith, Williamson County

· Tom Smith, Davidson County

· Pete Sommer, Lewis County

· Jerry Stanley, Lauderdale County

· Roger Staton, Madison County

· Doug Stephenson, Madison County

· Nick Stewart, Montgomery County

· Clayton Stout, Washington County

· Wes Stowers, Jr., Knox County

· Michael Strickland, Knox County

· Leroy Thompson, Knox County

· David Verble, Sevier County

· Jim Vines, Jefferson County

· Howard Wall, Rutherford County

· Harry Wampler, Loudon County

· Ron Watkins, Knox County

· John Weathers, Hamilton County

· Ted Welch, Davidson County

· Charles West, Blount County

· Andy White, Blount County

· Kahren White, Blount County

· Ken White, Monroe County

· Tommy Whittaker, Sumner County

· Ted Williams, Dickson County

· Chad Wood, Henderson County

· Shirley Woodcock, McMinn County

· Eleanor Yoakum, Claiborne County

· Kenny Young, Williamson County

Categories
Press Releases

Haslam Announces Small Business Initiative: Small Business Works

Press Release from Bill Haslam for Governor, March 17, 2010:

Identifies Small Businesses as the Driving Force for Tennessee’s Economy

JACKSON – Republican gubernatorial candidate Mayor Bill Haslam announced during a Jobs Tour meeting today with local small business owners a plan to focus on small business growth as a key component of his effort to make Tennessee the No. 1 state in the Southeast for high quality jobs.

As governor, Haslam will launch Small Business Works, an initiative to promote entrepreneurship and job growth by working with small business owners to create the best possible environment for starting or growing a business while enhancing the state’s efforts to provide useful, timely information and guidance to anyone seeking to start a business in Tennessee.

“I will have no higher priority as your governor than fostering the creation of high quality jobs in our state,” Haslam said. “The reality is two-thirds of the new jobs in this country are created by small businesses. If we want our state to be a leader in job creation, we need to embrace and cultivate small business ownership.

“From the beginning of this campaign, we’ve been meeting with small business owners, hearing their concerns, and discussing what the state could be doing better to help small businesses create jobs. As governor, listening to and addressing the needs of small business will be a key part of our economic development efforts.”

Mayor Haslam is spending Week Two of his three-week, statewide Jobs Tour in West Tennessee, and today is being spent in Jackson, Trenton, Humboldt, and Bells leading small business roundtables, touring local businesses, and meeting with economic development professionals.

“What I hear all the time, and especially on this Jobs Tour, is that government shouldn’t be a hindrance. It can’t over regulate and taxes must be kept low,” Haslam continued. “The state should make sure the necessary information and resources for starting a business are readily available, and it should provide high quality customer service to anyone who has questions or needs help with the process.”

The Small Business Works campaign will include a number of new initiatives and enhanced efforts to support small businesses, which will be rolled out over the coming weeks and months. The goal is to make sure there is no better place in the country to start or grow a business than Tennessee.

“There are many great reasons to do business in Tennessee,” Haslam said. “We have no state income tax, each region has unique assets on which we can build, and our beautiful landscape provides a high quality of life for Tennesseans. We’re also a right-to-work state, and our labor force is made up of honest, hard-working individuals,” Haslam continued. “But the fact of the matter is the next governor will have to be aggressive in the effort to create jobs. This will require a laser-like focus on the needs of small business.”

”The current administration has done a good job hitting home runs by bringing in large investments like Hemlock, Volkswagen, and Wacker,” Haslam continued. “But if we truly want to be a leader in job creation, we’ve got to focus on the singles, doubles, and triples that homegrown small businesses create for us as well.”

Bill Haslam is the two-term Mayor of Knoxville, re-elected in 2007 with 87% of the vote. A hardworking, conservative public servant, he led Knoxville to become one of the top ten metropolitan areas for business and expansion, while reducing the city’s debt, tripling the rainy day fund, and bringing property taxes to the lowest rate in 50 years. An executive leader with a proven record of success, he helped grow his family’s small business from 800 employees into one of Tennessee’s largest companies with 14,000 employees. His combination of executive and public service experience makes him uniquely qualified to be Tennessee’s next Governor. Bill is the right person at the right time to lead Tennessee.

Bill and Crissy Haslam have two daughters, Annie and Leigh, and a son, Will, who resides in Knoxville with his wife, Hannah.

For more information on Bill Haslam, please visit www.BillHaslam.com. To follow Mayor Haslam on his Jobs Tour and submit ideas for how to grow our state’s economy, please visit www.Jobs4TN.com.

Categories
Press Releases

Gibbons Tours Sharp Manufacturing Plant; Focuses On Jobs Of Future

Press Release from Bill Gibbons for Governor, March 17, 2010:

Memphis, TN – Shelby County District Attorney General Bill Gibbons today re-enforced his pledge to focus on job creation, once he is elected governor. Gibbons toured Sharp Manufacturing Plant in Memphis to learn more about this leader in the production of solar panels, and to get feedback on how the next governor can help secure new and existing industry in Tennessee.

“As governor, I’ll make creating jobs a top priority. I also want to focus on jobs of the future, such as those in the solar industry. Sharp Manufacturing is an outstanding example of a Tennessee business that leads the world in this field. In the last year, Sharp has tripled the number of solar panels it produces and has increased employment from approximately 500 workers to about 800. This is the kind of growth we need to see throughout Tennessee, ” Gibbons said.

General Gibbons also reiterated the need to properly market Tennessee as a place to do business.

“I believe that the keys to keeping and attracting businesses like Sharp are to keep taxes low, offer incentive packages on a cost/analysis basis and to make sure that we have a workforce in Tennessee trained to do the jobs local industry needs. I want to make sure these things happen,” Gibbons added.

Bill Gibbons, a Republican, is the Shelby County District Attorney General, serving as the top state law enforcement official in Tennessee’s largest jurisdiction. He entered the governor’s race on January 4, 2009. For more information on Bill Gibbons, visit his campaign website at www.Gibbons2010.com.