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Haslam Names DUI Prosecutor as 17th Judicial District Attorney

Press release from the Office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam; July 13, 2012:

17th Judicial District includes Lincoln, Bedford, Marshall and Moore counties

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced Robert Carter as the District Attorney General to the 17th Judicial District, which includes Lincoln, Bedford, Marshall and Moore counties.

Carter will replace current 17th Judicial District Attorney General Charles Crawford, who is resigning effective July 31.

“Robert represents the full picture of what we were looking for as the new district attorney general, and I appreciate his willingness to serve the citizens of the 17th District,” Haslam said.

Raised in Lincoln County, Carter has been an assistant district attorney since 2010, working in the child support division and, most recently, as the state DUI grant prosecutor. In the child support division, he established, prosecuted, enforced, reviewed and, when appropriate, modified all child support matters for the district.

As the DUI prosecutor for the district, he prosecutes in all courts and has responsibility for all criminal charges associated with each DUI defendant.

“I’m humbled and excited about the opportunity before me, and I appreciate the governor’s confidence in me,” Carter said. “I look forward to any challenges that lie ahead and serving the citizens of the 17th Judicial District.”

Before working as an assistant district attorney, Carter was with the firm Smith Cashion & Orr, PLC from May 2006 to December 2010, handling complex construction disputes and litigation. He has been admitted to the U.S. District Courts for the Western, Middle and Eastern Districts of Tennessee and the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and he is a member of the Tennessee and American Bar Associations.

Carter, 31, is a magna cum laude graduate of Cumberland University and earned his law degree from the University of Memphis, Cecil B. Humphreys School of Law in 2006.

He lives in Fayetteville with his wife Kristin, four-year-old son, Bruce, and one-year-old daughter, Sophie. He is an assistant baseball coach at Fayetteville high and middle schools.

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Press Releases

State Prohibits Open-Air Burning for 7 Counties, More Expected

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Agriculture; June 29, 2012:  

NASHVILLE – State Agriculture Commissioner Julius Johnson has issued a burn ban for Cheatham, Dickson, Gibson, Giles, Marshall, Maury and Sumner counties. The burn ban is effective immediately and will remain in place until further notice.

The ban applies to all open-air burning including leaf and woody debris and construction burning, campfires, outdoor grills and other fire activity outside of municipalities where local ordinances apply.

Under state law, the commissioner of agriculture, in consultation with the state forester, has the authority to issue burn bans at the request of county mayors under certain weather conditions. Requests from county mayors for a burn ban are considered in consultation with the state forester based on a number of factors including weather, climate, fire danger, fire occurrence and resource availability.

“We’re working with local officials to take action when requested and where appropriate to reduce the risk to citizens, property and emergency workers,” Johnson said. “With the extremely dry conditions and little prospect for rain anytime soon, we want to encourage the public to use good judgment and to avoid situations that can cause fire, even in areas not covered under a burn ban.”

A violation of a Commissioner of Agriculture Burn Ban is considered reckless burning and is punishable as a Class A misdemeanor which carries a fine of $2,500 and/or up to 11 months 29 days in jail.

The burn ban does not prohibit the use of fireworks. However, citizens should check for local restrictions and are encouraged to attend public displays as an alternative to shooting fireworks themselves for the Fourth of July holiday.

In areas not under a burn ban, the public is asked to refrain from debris burning until significant precipitation is received and to avoid other activities that could cause fire.

State and local firefighters are seeing an increase in fire activity statewide. Major causes include sparks from field equipment and vehicles, escaped debris burns, discarded cigarettes, lightening, campfires, arson and fireworks. Citizens can help support their local fire departments by checking for and following local burn restrictions and quickly reporting any wildfire.

Counties currently under a burn ban, additional fire safety tips and wildfire information can be found on the TDA Division of Forestry’s wildfire prevention website at www.burnsafetn.org.

Note: A press release from TDA will not necessarily be released for each new county added to the list of the Commissioner of Agriculture Burn Bans. Please check www.burnsafetn.org for updated information.