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Pressure Builds Over State-Local Control of Charter Schools

Republicans who laud government that stays close to the people are finding themselves in a pickle now that a local school board has bucked state law.

Metro Nashville Public Schools’ Board of Education ignored orders by the Tennessee Board of Education to usher the charter school Great Hearts Academies into the district last week — the second such rebuff in a month. The Metro schools board contends that the first of five schools, run by a Phoenix-based charter school operator, would lack diversity and pander to an affluent Nashville neighborhood.

The Great Hearts dispute has exposed Republican leaders to criticism that they espouse local control only when it suits their aims.

“This whole thing just flies in the face of Republican philosophy when you have the big bad state coming down telling the local school board they have to comply with the law,” said Jerry Winters, a lobbyist with the Tennessee Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union, which has been resistant to the emergence of school choice.

Charter schools have enjoyed favorable treatment at the hands of GOP Gov. Bill Haslam and his education department. The administration’s agenda for reform has included tougher standards for teacher tenure, tying teacher evaluations to test scores and an expansion of charter schools.

Metro schools’ refusal to grant Great Hearts permission to open a school has sparked statewide debate over whether local approval is best. Great Hearts announced that it would not challenge the Metro schools’ decision.

“It’s really been kind of shocking to watch a government openly acknowledge and violate the law,” said Matt Throckmorton, executive director of the Tennessee Charter Schools Association.

Disgusted by the ongoing feud, Throckmorton and other charter school advocates are pushing for the state to assemble an outside agency to review and approve charter school applications, allowing charter operators to leap-frog over the local school district.

Details on how that system would operate are still in the works.

Throckmorton says local school districts should still be involved with discussions about pending charter schools. But politics are getting in the way of opening quality schools that could find more effective ways to teach children, he said.

Opponents of the idea say locally elected school board members — rather than a handful of appointed officials in Nashville — should decide whether a charter school is the right fit for the district and the community.

“I think people are wanting to make this an example to justify their intent to make a statewide authorizer,” said Lee Harrell, a lobbyist for the Tennessee School Boards Association which is opposed to charter schools skipping over local officials. “Often you hear the best decisions are made on the ground. (State approval) would totally fly in the face of that mentality.”

Several top state officials are staying quiet on the matter, including Department of Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman, who in August said the state would take “appropriate action” to see to it that Metro schools approved the charter school.

He declined to comment on the latest denial for Great Hearts, although emails obtained by the City Paper indicate he was keenly interested in getting the application approved and has engaged in discussions about the need for a statewide authorizer.

The governor’s office has also been silent on the issue, although officials say they were waiting for Haslam to return from his economic development trip in Japan last week. Prior to Metro schools’ first rejection of the Great Hearts application, Haslam said he saw no need to develop a state panel to approve charter schools.

Senate Education Committee Chairwoman Dolores Gresham has also declined to comment.

But Republican legislative leaders who have repeatedly offered messages about the importance of local control hint that they’d be open to a plan giving the state more power.

“I am extremely dismayed that the Nashville School Board is focused on limiting parental choice and educational opportunity for children,” Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey told TNReport in an email. “It is unfortunate that the board seems mired in the old education politics while the rest of the state is moving forward.”

House Speaker Beth Harwell agreed, calling the decision by MNPS “simply a mistake for our children” and saying the Legislature “will revisit this issue” when they come back in January.

“We believe in local government and local school boards. But when they don’t give opportunities for our children, then that’s a problem,” she said.

Charter schools are privately-owned but publicly-funded. Supporters say they offer more flexibility to innovate and create choice and competition, while detractors say they drain public money and students, leaving traditional public schools with the students hardest to educate.

Charter school performance is generally mixed. Last school year, two charter schools ranked among the best performing institutions in the state, while five other charter schools reflected some of the worst student academic records statewide.

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Press Releases

Three Appointed to TN Board of Ed.

Press Release from Gov. Bill Haslam, June 24, 2011:

Edwards and Roberts join board, Pearre reappointed

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced three members of the state Board of Education: Knoxville Chamber President and CEO Mike Edwards; former Executive Director of the Tennessee Board of Regents’ Tech Prep Programs Carolyn Pearre; and TRH Health Plans CEO Lonnie Roberts.

Edwards, Pearre and Roberts are each appointed to nine-year terms, and for Pearre, this is her second term on the board. Edwards and Roberts are replacing Richard Ray and Flavius Barker.

The Tennessee Board of Education is the governing and policy making body for the state’s public and secondary education systems, affecting accountability, evaluation, curriculum and teacher education, among other areas.

“Improving the education we offer Tennesseans is the best long-term job growth strategy, and I’m confident Carolyn, Lonnie and Mike are up to the task of helping to guide the state’s schools as we seek to positively impact the classroom experience for every student in every school,” Haslam said.

Edwards has been president and CEO of the Knoxville Chamber since 2002, and he is also the president and CEO of The Development Corporation of Knox County. He serves on the Education Committee of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Board of Directors of the Public School Forum of East Tennessee, the state Teacher Evaluation Advisory Committee and the Board of Trustees for the Great Schools Partnership.

Roberts has nearly 40 years of experience in the health care field and has been the CEO of TRH Health Plans since 1996. He is the immediate past chairman of the Columbia State Foundation Board and has served on the State Health Care Facilities Commission, the Board of Directors of the Rural Health Association of Tennessee and the Advisory Board of Maury Regional Hospital.

From 1972-1999, Pearre worked for Knox County schools, beginning as a speech-language therapist and preschool teacher and finishing at The Center School as a program facilitator. She was on the Board of Trustees for the state’s then-Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation; the Board of Trustees for the Lakeshore Mental Health Institute; and the Board of Directors for Leadership Knoxville. Pearre also won several awards as a teacher and principal.