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Turner Hopes Dems Can Capitalize on GOP Rifts

The caucus chairman of the Democrats in Tennessee’s House of Representatives predicts three to six Democratic gains in the House, and perhaps more, if the chips fall their way.

“Any gains we have we will be a victory for us,” Rep. Mike Turner, D-Old Hickory, told TNReport. “I think we can pick off three to six people within reason, and maybe if things go our way nationally a little better we might even get a little higher than that.”

One of the biggest problems Democrats in Tennessee face is at the top of the ticket: President Obama. Indeed, the Democrats’ historic losses in the legislature came with Obama’s popularity in Tennessee sinking to Mariana Trench-like lows. But Turner said that Obama is more popular now than he was in 2010.

“It’s not going to be as bad as it was,” he said, pointing to Obama making significant gains, particularly in Middle Tennessee.

But if Turner’s party doesn’t catch the breaks it needs, he says that Democrats have some built-in advantages — even against a possible Republican supermajority.

“We have more experienced people,” he said. “We know how to govern.”

Republicans need just two more seats to gain a supermajority, which would be 66 seats out of 99.

If the GOP gains a supermajority, fully half of Tennessee House members will have two years or less experience maneuvering through committees and playing hard-ball politics at Legislative Plaza.

The other key advantage, Turner said, is the unity of the Democratic minority.

“Our people will have 32, 33 people back… hopefully a little higher,” he said. “Our people will be solidly behind each other, where (the Republicans) are somewhat separated. You have the traditional Lamar Alexander, Howard Baker, Beth Harwell, Bill Haslam-type Republicans, then they’ve got the very extremist Republicans out there that seem to be pushing the wagon right now and trying to lead them in a direction to the extreme right.”

That creates a split that his caucus can take advantage of, Turner said, and, because of that, “My 30-some-odd Democratic votes is a pretty large block when it comes time to pass some important bills.”

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Ramsey: Signs Pointing Toward GOP Supermajority in Senate

[youtube height=”HEIGHT” width=”WIDTH”]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDTYwGvWGVE[/youtube]


Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey
says that come Election Day, Republicans will enjoy a supermajority in the Tennessee Senate — meaning that the GOP will not need any Democratic support to pass legislation.

“I do think we’re going to have the supermajority,” Ramsey told TNReport. “There are six seats we’re playing in, and none of us as incumbent Republicans have serious opposition. This is the first time I’ve ever run without an opponent.”

Republicans need to win two more seats to snag the supermajority, or 22 of the 33 seats.

And if money talks, Ramsey may be right. GOP candidates for state Senate have a massive financial lead going into the final days of their campaigns, according to campaign finance reports released by the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance.

The reports released this week show Republican Senate candidates with a more than 2-to-1 lead in terms of cash on hand. And when you add up the total amount of money raised in contested races, Republicans have outraised Democrats $1.8 million to $861,000 since Jan. 1, records show.

You can search all of the filings by clicking here.

Perhaps more telling is the amount of money spent in the past two months, which is what the most recent campaign finance reports show.

Of the six key races that Ramsey spoke of, Republicans have spent $384,041 and Democrats have spent $253,451, according to those filings.

That’s money that goes for newspaper and radio ads, campaign workers, mailings, food and gas to fill up the gas tank.

In only one of those races did the Democrat outspend his opponent. That was the race in Senate District 24, a West Tennessee district that spans from Obion County to Benton County.

In that race, Democrat Brad Thompson spent $111,372 over the past two months. His Republican opponent John Stevens spent $62,932 over that same period.

Most of the six races, though, more closely resemble the contest in Senate District 20, a district that surrounds downtown Nashville like a letter “C” spanning from Belle Meade to Goodlettsville. Republican Steve Dickerson plowed $54,941 into the race over the past two months. His opponent, Democrat Phillip North, spent $28,028 over that same period.

“I do think there will be significant gains,” Ramsey said. “Somewhere between two (Senate seats) to five or six.”

This is not the first time that Ramsey has been talking about a possible supermajority. Check out what he told the Nashville Scene and Nooga.com.

Other Senate seats identified as being in play include:

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NewsTracker Tax and Budget

Gas-Tax Talks Not on Administration’s Immediate To-Do List

State transportation officials say the state needs to start thinking about how to charge drivers for using state roads, but the governor says there’s no consensus to tackle that issue this year.

While the state transportation department says the issue is squarely on the administration’s radar, Gov. Bill Haslam says the topic won’t be among those he’s interested in come 2013.

“We definitely won’t be addressing that this year,” Haslam told reporters Thursday following an economic development announcement in Nashville, adding that both he and Transportation Commissioner John Schroer believe it’s “inevitable” that the state will have to address that issue down the road.

“The way we’re paying for roads and bridges now won’t work long-term. And I think John’s acknowledging that. That being said, there’s not much consensus about how you do fix that problem,” he said.

Schroer is in the middle of a fall tour to various transportation projects across the state. The department has $9.5 billion worth of projects under development, but only has about $900 million to work with this year.

The issue is nothing new to Tennessee. Schroer told the governor and other high-ranking officials during budget hearings last year that the state will need to reconsider how it collects money for roads as people shift to vehicles that guzzle less gas.

Tennessee charges 21.4 cents a gallon for gasoline, ranking in the bottom third of state gas tax rates in the country, according to the American Petroleum Institute. The state tax on diesel is 18.4 cents a gallon. That’s on top of a federal tax of 18.4 cents a gallon on gasoline and 24.4 cents a gallon on diesel.

The Beacon Center suggests the state consider other options besides simply raising the tax on fuel. The free-market think tank released a report this week analyzing the state’s various options, like charging taxes based on miles traveled, emissions or installing toll roads.

Not all the money from the gas tax is spent on highways. Across the country, the gas tax has been diverted for other projects, including schools, parks and beautification.

Haslam last year said it’s possible he’ll put off serious talk about rejiggering gas taxes until a possible second term.